Search form

Login - Register | FOLLOW US ON

Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Traffic injuries drop in capital

Traffic injuries drop in capital

090817_05
An officer inspects a traffic accident that left four people dead after a truck crashed into the rear of a Camry on National Road 4 earlier this year.

TRAFFIC injuries in Phnom Penh decreased by 55 percent from May 2008 to May 2009, according to a report released on Friday by the National Road Safety Committee (NRSC), a local traffic safety group.

In a survey of hospitals, health centres, private clinics and traffic police departments in 24 provinces, NRSC found that in May 2009, there were 627 crashes throughout the Kingdom, resulting in 1,446 casualties, including 131 fatalities and 479 severe injuries.

Though crashes and total casualties in Cambodia decreased compared with May 2008 by 13 percent each, fatalities saw a 12 percent increase.

In Phnom Penh, however, the news was much better. Some 219 traffic-related casualties were reported in the capital in May 2009, a 55 percent
decrease from May 2008. The survey reported 13 traffic deaths in Phnom Penh from this May, compared with 26 during the previous year.

Ung Chun Hour, director of the NSRC, said that enforcement of the Land Traffic Law - which requires motorbike drivers to wear helmets, among other regulations - is the most likely source of this decline in road injuries.

0

Comments

Please, login or register to post a comment

Latest Video

Khmer Rouge survivors react to First They Killed My Father

Angelina Jolie's First They Killed My Father depicts some of the atrocities committed during the Pol Pot regime. How did watching it feel for those who were alive at the time?

Cambodia's last tile masters: Why a local craft is under threat

Brought over by the French, painted cement tile making has been incorporated into Cambodian design for more than a century, even as the industry has died out in Europe.

Interview: Loung Ung, author of First They Killed My Father

The story of Loung Ung and her family’s suffering under the Khmer Rouge became known around the world with the success of her autobiography.