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Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - US firm asks for trash tip

US firm asks for trash tip

US firm asks for trash tip

THE government is considering a plan by a United States-based company to build

a $300 million waste incineration plant in Sihanoukville. If accepted, it would be

the first plant of its kind in Cambodia.

The high-technology plant would produce electricity from incinerated hazardous waste,

using plasma technology.

Officials at the Ministry of Environment have confirmed that an application was made

last month by a New York-based company, the Lok Hang Group, to install the incinerator.

However, they said that no decision has yet been taken and technical experts from

the EU as well as the American-based Environmenntal Protection Agency are being asked

for advice.

Earlier this year, representatives from the company came to Cambodia for talks on

the project with the co-premiers and senior government officials. Ministry officials

said they originally floated proposals to dispose of medical and nuclear waste. Both

were firmly dismissed by the ministry.

"We need to discuss this with experts," said Khieu Muth, director-general

at the Ministry of Environment. "There are many technical issues that need to

be considered - it's a high-technology project and the ministry lacks technical experts.

But we are worried that it could be difficult to control and manage.

"Also, there's the problem of public opinion. People don't like the idea of

waste being shipped to their own country. People are worried about air pollution

and storage of solid waste."

In its letter, the company does not mention the quantities of hazardous waste that

might be involved - but describes the waste as a mixture of fuel and oil residue,

spent batteries and photographic materials.

There are now strict guidelines covering the movement of hazardous wastes and their

disposal. The Basel Convention, signed by more than 100 countries in Malaysia this

February, bans the export of certain hazardous wastes - including mercury, lead,

arsenic, asbestos and dozens more chemicals and substances.

But the convention signatories are mainly from developed nations, including member

states of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. Cambodia is

not a signatory to the Convention.

However, shipments of hazardous waste from the US to Cambodia would be affected by

the convention.

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