Search

Search form

Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Vendors say restrictions hurt sales

Vendors say restrictions hurt sales

Vendors say restrictions hurt sales

Content image - Phnom Penh Post

Traditionally a boom time for crafts sellers from the provinces, this year's festival have proven a bust

Photo by:
Heng Chivoan

A vendor from the provinces waits for customers in the riverside's Wat Ounalom, where many sellers say they have been forced to set up shop by authorities who have kicked them off of the capital's promenade. Police say the vendors get in the way of traffic.

VILLAGERS who hauled thousands of handmade products from their provinces to sell at the water festival have complained of new police restrictions on the places they can sell, and excessive demands by police for street tax.

"Every year we have been allowed to sell on riverfront streets, but this year we are limited to selling inside the Ounalom pagoda," said Chey Chan, 36, who brought souvenir handicrafts from her home in Siem Reap to sell at the festival.

She added that despite the new limitations and the impact of them on their sales, police were frequently demanding they pay a street tax.  

"Three to five police come to take money from us each day. They take 1,000 riels each time, so we spend between 3,000 riels and 5,000 riels in tax," she said. "I am worried that I may have no money to board a taxi back to my home due to the police limiting our sales and taking money from us."

Pich Socheata, deputy governor of Daun Penh district, said Tuesday that vendors were not allowed to place goods on the street sides of Sothearos and Sisowath Quays because of traffic.

"Limiting vendors to sell their products in the pagoda is to facilitate traffic for festival goers and to keep order along the streets," she said, declining to comment on police bribes. 

RECOMMENDED STORIES

  • Breaking: PM says prominent human rights NGO ‘must close’

    Prime Minister Hun Sen has instructed the Interior Ministry to investigate the Cambodian Center for Human Rights (CCHR) and potentially close it “because they follow foreigners”, appearing to link the rights group to the opposition Cambodia National Rescue Party's purported “revolution”. The CNRP - the

  • Rainsy and Sokha ‘would already be dead’: PM

    Prime Minister Hun Sen on Sunday appeared to suggest he would have assassinated opposition leaders Sam Rainsy and Kem Sokha had he known they were promising to “organise a new government” in the aftermath of the disputed 2013 national elections. In a clip from his speech

  • Massive ceremony at Angkor Wat will show ‘Cambodia not in anarchy’: PM

    Government officials, thousands of monks and Prime Minister Hun Sen himself will hold a massive prayer ceremony at Angkor Wat in early December to highlight the Kingdom’s continuing “peace, independence and political stability”, a spectacle observers said was designed to disguise the deterioration of

  • PM tells workers CNRP is to blame for any sanctions

    In a speech to workers yesterday, Prime Minister Hun Sen pinned the blame for any damage inflicted on Cambodia’s garment industry by potential economic sanctions squarely on the opposition party. “You must remember clearly that if the purchase orders are reduced, it is all