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Wasting funds on army

Dear Editor,

I find it hard to comprehend the Cambodian annual budget.

With appalling health standards and high illiteracy rate the Cambodian

Government still finds it fit to inject more than a quarter of its annual

budget, about half of which comes from foreign donors, on defense.

What

is the logic behind this? Cambodia's transport system is dotted by potholes, its

education system is in such a state that the schools don't have any libraries so

students depend on what is taught by teachers.

And according to the World

Health Organization, Cambodians spend a large proportion of their income on

medication because of the non-existence of a public health

system.

Wouldn't the money the Government spends on the army be better

spent addressing some of the major issues mentioned above?

Why should

Cambodia be prepared for war any more? The Khmer Rouge have ceased to be a

political or military force.

Putting money into educating the children

would seem to be a wiser investment. After all, today's world is built on

knowledge, not war.

The world's richest men, such as Bill Gates, do not

command any army nor do they own any land. They created their wealth out of

their own knowledge.

I hope that the people of Cambodia and the many

donors pay more attention to the way their money is being used.

- Peron C Perth, Australia

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