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Latter–day Saints couple donate time

Latter–day Saints couple donate time

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US Ambassador to Cambodia William E Todd, left, enjoys a light moment with Kandi and Dennis James, elders in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints who are giving their time and effort to a mission in Cambodia. Photograph: Stuart Alan Becker/Phnom Penh Post

Kandi James who, along with her husband Dennis, are elders with The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, also known as the LDS or Mormon church.

This American couple are serving a traditional role common to dedicated Mormons, after they have raised their families, to serve in a mission somewhere in the world and support the conversion of local peoples to their faith.

With more than 14 million Mormon church members total, about 6.1 million of whom live in the United States, the LDS tradition is to send youngsters on missions around the world.

Mormons practice a health code whereby there is no drinking of alcoholic beverages, tobacco, coffee, tea or other addictive substances. Members of the LDS church tend to be very family oriented and practice a strict law of chastity which requires that people abstain from sexual relations outside of marriage and observe fidelity within marriage.

In addition to the Bible, Mormons also use the Book of Mormon.

In terms of humanitarian assistance in Cambodia, members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has donated a total of US$9.2 million to all kinds of projects to benefit needy people since 1990.

Young Mormons on missions are easily identifiable by their black name tags, friendly behavior and are usually seen riding bicycles in groups of two.

Mormons have a reputation worldwide for service to others and good conduct.

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