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Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Interview Co-founder and CEO of renowned The Frangipani Hotel Group, Somethearith Din

Interview Co-founder and CEO of renowned The Frangipani Hotel Group, Somethearith Din

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Interview Co-founder and CEO of renowned The Frangipani Hotel Group, Somethearith Din

Co-founder and CEO of renowned The Frangipani Hotel Group, Somethearith Din, speaks to Post Property about the quaint appeal of boutique hotels within the Kingdom.

What distinguishes a boutique hotel from a standard hotel?
A boutique hotel is associated with charm. They are smaller sized and usually hold less than 100 rooms. However, in Cambodia, boutique hotels mostly consist of less than 50 rooms.

How is the aesthetic and architecture different from boutique hotels?
As a very well crafted and decorated hotel, a boutique hotel normally promotes local arts and culture because it is smaller in size and thus requires – and can afford – more dedication to its architecture and décor.

Can you estimate for us how many boutique hotels are in Phnom Penh, or are members of the Cambodia Hotel Association (CHA)?
While many small and minimum-sized hotels label themselves as boutique hotels, there are no more than 100 boutique hotels in Phnom Penh. The CHA has around 20 boutique hotels as members in Phnom Penh and the boutique hotel members are higher in number in Siem Reap.

Why do some people prefer staying in a boutique hotel?
They are mostly family travellers or those who appreciate the arts and local cultures, and want a quiet and peaceful environment.

Can you shed some details on one of your boutique hotels?
We have boutique hotels that have seven rooms while others have 72 rooms. Room rates range from $35 to $65 a night. It can take between six months and a year to renovate a room at a boutique hotel and can cost up to $15,000 per room to undertake renovation works.

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