Search

Search form

Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - From Field to Wok: Bringing farmers and chefs together

From Field to Wok: Bringing farmers and chefs together

Content image - Phnom Penh Post
Chan Sophea of the Cambodia Chefs Association and Hai Vuthy, the group’s president. Thik Kaliyann

From Field to Wok: Bringing farmers and chefs together

Program aims to increase both use and production of organic vegetables

The Cambodia Chefs Association last weekend organised for 100 chefs to visit Kro Bei Reil commune, where the local community grows organic vegetables.

Association president Hai Vuthy said the excursion was organised in conjunction with Agrisud International as part of its first-ever From Field to Wok program to encourage chefs to use more locally grown produce and to show farmers that there was demand for their product.

“We would like to bring our chefs to meet local farmers because when the chefs came to the village, they can see what kind of crops that the farmers have. So after that, the chef will try to cook dishes by using the natural ingredients that we have here,” Vuthy said.

At Kro Bei Riel, almost every villager has their own patch of organic garden.

However, even though just a few Siem Reap hotels and restaurants have already started buying chemical-free vegetables from local farmers, demand has already outstripped supply, Vuthy said.

“That’s why we encourage [the farmers] to grow more, and then we will help to buy more,” he said.

The program has also provided a chance for farmers and chefs to build relationships by sharing experiences and ideas on how to work together, said Long Bora, vice president of the chefs’ association.

“We’ll know what they want and they’ll know what we want,” he said.

Bora said more hotels and restaurants in Siem Reap should support local farmers by buying local products as it would encourage the farmers to grow more crops.

“It’s not only that you’ll get healthy food to eat, but it’ll also help to support our local farmers,” he added.

A local farmer, Yoeun Yin, who grows many kinds of crops such as pepper, leafy greens and eggplant, said the program was proving very helpful in expanding the market for villagers’ produce.

“I do not want to see our people or tourists eat chemical-covered vegetables imported from other countries,” he said.

“I promise to work hard to grow more crops to satisfy market demand, and I hope to get support from everyone as well.”

RECOMMENDED STORIES

  • Breaking: PM says prominent human rights NGO ‘must close’

    Prime Minister Hun Sen has instructed the Interior Ministry to investigate the Cambodian Center for Human Rights (CCHR) and potentially close it “because they follow foreigners”, appearing to link the rights group to the opposition Cambodia National Rescue Party's purported “revolution”. The CNRP - the

  • Rainsy and Sokha ‘would already be dead’: PM

    Prime Minister Hun Sen on Sunday appeared to suggest he would have assassinated opposition leaders Sam Rainsy and Kem Sokha had he known they were promising to “organise a new government” in the aftermath of the disputed 2013 national elections. In a clip from his speech

  • Massive ceremony at Angkor Wat will show ‘Cambodia not in anarchy’: PM

    Government officials, thousands of monks and Prime Minister Hun Sen himself will hold a massive prayer ceremony at Angkor Wat in early December to highlight the Kingdom’s continuing “peace, independence and political stability”, a spectacle observers said was designed to disguise the deterioration of

  • PM tells workers CNRP is to blame for any sanctions

    In a speech to workers yesterday, Prime Minister Hun Sen pinned the blame for any damage inflicted on Cambodia’s garment industry by potential economic sanctions squarely on the opposition party. “You must remember clearly that if the purchase orders are reduced, it is all