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Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Media asked to cater to deaf, blind

Media asked to cater to deaf, blind

A coalition of disabled rights organisations has called on the government to provide more sign language on television for the deaf and radio services for the blind.

The Cambodian Disabled People’s Organisation yesterday conducted a workshop with the Ministry of Information and various disability advocacy groups on how to improve access to information for the hearing and visually impaired.

Action on Disability and Development project manager Sous Vansitha told workshop attendees that disabled people in the Kingdom suffered a serious lack of access to information.

“We need more help from the media to reach people about disability programs, the law and social education,” Vansitha said.

She cited cases of people not knowing the purpose of or how to obtain identity cards or family books, lacking information about political parties and being unaware of their rights under disability laws.

Hong Kimhak, from the Deaf Development Program of Marynoll, told the Post the government should encourage television stations to have more sign language, because broadcast media was the best method of reaching people with disabilities.

“Only a few television channels currently have any sign language,” he said.

Ministry of Information undersecretary Meas Sophorn told the workshop: “The ministry is happy to encourage television channels to include sign language to make access easier for people with disabilities.”

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