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TV stations: booze ad ban will hurt revenues

A bartender pours beer at a bar on Diamond Island in July
A bartender pours beer at a bar on Diamond Island in July Eli Meixler

TV stations: booze ad ban will hurt revenues

The Ministry of Information has announced that restrictions on alcohol advertising on television and radio will be implemented next month, and broadcasters are getting ready to feel the pinch.

According to state-run news agency Agence Kampuchea Presse, Minister of Information Khieu Kanharith will issue a directive that from October 1 puts restrictions on alcohol advertising between 6pm and 8pm, with a total ban during those hours to be enforced from January 1.

Local media has reported that the move is aimed at reducing alcohol-related traffic accidents among young people.

“Cambodia has not had any law on the ban of alcohol ads yet, but we volunteer to do so, it’s our social contribution,” Kanharith was quoted by AKP as saying.

Television stations said yesterday that they would respect the ban, but acknowledged that the move would also hurt advertising revenues.

Thith Thavarith, executive director of Bayon TV, one of Cambodia’s largest television stations, said that they had not yet received an official notification, but there was no doubt it would hurt his company’s bottom line.

“Well, it will absolutely affect our advertising revenue, and it is not only my TV station but others also,” he said. “Revenue from alcohol advertising contributes a lot compared to other [forms of advertising],” he said.

He declined to give details of how much the ban would cost the station.

Moun Ramady, general manager of CNC, was another who said yesterday that the directive would impact profits.

The CNC general manager estimated that alcohol advertising accounts for about 20 per cent of the company’s advertising income.

“Of course, we will get affected by it, but we have to comply with any rule or regulations from the government,” he said.

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