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I want to move to ... Tuol Kork, Phnom Penh

I want to move to ... Tuol Kork, Phnom Penh

Rental bargain

This two-bedroom villa is located in the heart of Tuol Kork in a quiet neighborhood with easy access to main streets. It includes free cable, water, laundry and cleaning for $700 per month. There is also 24-hour security and off-street parking. Contact Eric at CEA for more information on 012 276 020.

What's going for it?

Located in the northwest corner of the city, Tuol Kork is an exclusive labyrinth of streets twisting between gated communities and lavish homes. Quiet neighborhoods, cul-de-sacs and wide-open spaces make this an ideal area to raise a family. There are numerous housing options ranging from studio apartments to fully serviced high-rises to massive villas. Tuol Kork is quickly becoming a hot area to move to, and new development plans will provide more shopping, recreation and leisure activities in the future.

 
What's the catch?

Tuol Kork is very suburban and very expensive, and for the cosmopolitan urbanite it could feel a bit too insular and distant from the heart of the city. What little shopping, drinking and dining there is in the community is scattered, which makes walking impractical and dangerous on major streets. Also, while the many gated communities in Tuol Kork may provide comfort and safety to some, to others it may seem segregated and unsociable. The biggest drawback, however, is that there are no supermarkets in Tuol Kork.

 
Getting there, and away

Unless you work nearby or have flexible work hours, commuting to and from Tuol Kork can be a nightmare. Not only are the roads entering and exiting the area packed during rush hours, but entering the city during peak hours can be brutal especially crossing Russian Boulevard, which connects the city to the airport. Traffic in the community is fairly loose, however, and people can be seen bicycling and walking the suburban streets. Motos and tuk-tuks, while present, are vastly fewer in number in Tuol Kork as most people living in the area already have their own transportation.

 
Schools

Logos International, Zaman International and Western International School all have campuses in Tuol Kork. Logos International School is a private Christian school "seeking to impact Cambodia for Christ by raising up today's youth to be tomorrow's Christian leaders", but it plans to move its campus out of Tuol Kork at the end of this school year. Zaman International School is one of the only schools offering an international and bilingual curriculum. It is Council of International Schools (CIS) accredited and has a kindergarten and primary school campus in Tuol Kork. Western International School is a Khmer school that teaches classes in English. It already has several buildings and is continuing to expand. Northbridge International School is outside Tuol Kork but is very popular with residents. It is both Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC) and CIS accredited, and with one of the most beautiful campuses in Cambodia and outstanding facilities, it is one of the country's top schools.

Out of the house

There's not a whole lot going on in Tuol Kork. There are a few restaurants - mostly Khmer plastic-chair beer gardens and roadside eateries - but a number of Korean places are opening, and there are also a couple of western-style dining options. The two local markets are not outstanding but provide the necessary staples. Walking and bicycling is fairly safe along side streets, and it is interesting to get out and see how quickly the landscape is changing.  The Royal Rattanak Hospital in Tuol Kork, offers world-class medical facilities.

 
On the market

Tuol Kork has plenty of vacancies. Average apartment and flat rentals are between $700 and $1,200 per month. Land is currently fetching around $1,500 to $1,800.

 
Gated community villas

Sunway City is one of the prime gated communities in Tuol Kork. A number of properties are available, including luxury row houses for $280,000. They each measure six by 20 metres on six-by-28.8-metre plots. Each has four bedrooms, four bathrooms and all the modern amenities you'd expect. There is off-street parking and twenty-four-seven security. Contact John at Bonna Realty on 012 949 577.

From the streets of Tuol Kork

 

 

 

Nop Leang has lived in Tuol Kork for over a year and has seen many changes “It’s much safer than it used to be.” Leang said. He likes that the area is developing into a cleaner residential community and is happy that the streets are paved where once there was only dirt roads and garbage.
These lads have been living in the area with their families for about four years. They like Tuol Kork because many people in their age group live nearby and it’s close to their school. The drawback: “If you want to hang out with someone who lives in Boeung Keng Kang, it’s really far,” Zazz Both (right) said.
Tuy Pheapirak moved to Tuol Kork six months ago from O Russey. Tuy Pheapirak, who lives with his aging grandmother, says it is a good place for older people because it is quiet. And, unlike other parts of Phnom Penh, there are not so many street vendors and other people trying to sell you things.

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