Search form

Login - Register | FOLLOW US ON

Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Australian producer to modernize mundane Apsara dance shows

Australian producer to modernize mundane Apsara dance shows

We've all seen the traditional Apsara dance shows being advertised around town, often coupled with a hotel buffet dinner. It is a tried – and some might say tired – and tested tourist favourite but on Saturday, Hotel 1961 brings something different: a contemporary dance performance combining Apsara moves with jazz, soul and pop music.

The show is the brainchild of Australian Nick Coffill, producer of brand-new collective, the Bambu Stretch Project, “an intense, fourteen-week training program that uses the classical tradition of Cambodia as a framework for contemporary dance.”

The dance company so far consists of just three female performers who have been rehearsing for a month, and the fruits of their labours will be shown tomorrow, December 1, at 6.30pm.

The young dancers are all classically trained graduates from the School of Arts in Siem Reap.

Former theatre designer Coffill got the idea after watching countless hotel shows and feeling “they could be much better,” with higher production values.


Classical dance teacher Ms Yon Chanta (L) with the three new dancers Son Srey Nith, Kong Seng Va and Khun Srey Noch. Photograph Nick Coffill

He says, “We see in Siem Reap a great opportunity to change the face of the tourist and hotel shows, where we see kids having to repeat ad nauseum the coconut dance and the Apsara dance. What’s happening is Khmer culture is being flattened out. We see it as a chance to think about the contemporary world, and take that great classical tradition of Cambodian dance and ratchet it up to the 21st century.”

Dutch choreographer and artistic director Bob Ruijzendaal has been working with the trio on various routines set to modern music.

“Bob is using a whole kaleidoscope of different music,” Coffill says, “From the great music of Sinn Sisamouth, the music of the 1960s of Cambodia, which is still played on the radio. We’re looking at jazz music, world music, pop, anything that’s got a light fresh attitude that can engage with the dancers.”

The girls have also been working with top classical dancers from Phnom Penh with international experience who, Coffill says, know how to engage with the audience “using the eye” – something that’s not typically seen in traditional Khmer dance.

“Traditional court dancing in Cambodia is dancing for the gods. So to engage with an audience is unnecessary. The idea of winking or pouting to the audience is a complete anathema.”

In Coffill’s new, modern vision of Apsara the girls won’t be dressed in traditional costume, just simple cotton trousers and t-shirts – the costume of contemporary dance.

The 35 minute performance will include stories about working women in Cambodia – from the night market stall holder to the street sweeper.

Long-term, Coffill plans to expand the dance troupe, and to establish the Bambu Theatre Company. His aim is to be Siem Reap’s “first contemporary, full-time dance company” by summer 2013, giving weekly performances of “damn good theatre” at various venues for locals and tourists alike.

0

Comments

Please, login or register to post a comment

Latest Video

Bodies of Cambodian peacekeepers returned to Kingdom

The bodies of four Cambodian peacekeepers killed by a Christian militia in Central African Republic were repatriated to the Kingdom and honoured in an airport ceremony on May 21.

Phnom Penh eats: Ptas Nak Battambang

As the name suggests, Ptsa Nak Battambang – which in English means Battambang's house – is the right place for those who want to try some of the province's typical dishes in Phnom Penh.

Defence Minister Tea Banh yesterday said the popular appeal of the Cambodia National Rescue Party’s pledge to substantially boost commune budgets p

Opposition surrogate Kong Korm speaks to supporters at a campaign event on Monday in Prey Veng province in front a CNRP banner bearing the face of ex-party leader Sam Rainsy. Facebook

The National Election Committee has rejected an opposition campaign advertisement from airing on a state-owned television station because it featur