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Fitting finale for the La Paix art exhibitions

Fitting finale for the La Paix art exhibitions

It’s the last gasp for Hotel de la Paix’s art exhibitions, with the final show opening in usual fine form last night.

The final show, titled Seven, will run until June 27, and will feature seven artists, celebrating the seventh anniversary of the re-opening of Hotel de la Paix in 2005.

Resident curator, Sasha Constable, includes her stone carvings from an ongoing series about gods and demons inspired by Angkor.

Phnom Penh artist Chhan Dina is represented with her paintings that illustrate scenes from everyday life.  She was the only female artist to take part in Impact, an exhibit about landmines organised by the UN in 2009.

Leang Seckon, one of the leading contemporary Cambodian artists, unveiled his series,  My Feeling from the Buddha. The paintings depict his personal feelings about Buddha and focus on the body of the Buddha and his many different forms.

Meas Sokhorn showcases a series of sculptures composed of wire, manual labor tools and objects he recovered from ‘et chia,’ or rubbish collectors. According to the press release, “The objects are physical representations of cultural practices displaced by modernity.”

Also on show are works from Takeo artist Svay Ken, who  was self taught and started painting at 60 years of age. He’s at times dubbed, ‘The grandfather of Cambodian contemporary art,’ and he died in 2008.

His oil paintings depict scenes from everyday life.

Works by Vincent Broustet, a French artist who settled in Kampot in 2004, are also showcased.  He works with a varied subject matter including landscape, architecture and people, and his series on show delves into his fascination with people as they sleep.

Of course there can be no modern art show without representations from neighboring Battambang, and young artist Yim Maline makes her mark in the exhibition.

According to the press release, Yim Maline’s, “Rigorous and meticulous practice spans media and scrutinises the complexities of freedom. By reinterpreting childhood memories and unraveling contradictions of the present she creates work in which the playful and unsettling coincide.”

Her paintings look good too.

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