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Supplements

On my first day on the job at The Phnom Penh Post, our publisher, Michael Hayes, sent me to cover a press conference about the approaching 2003 election.

Bill Bainbridge (left) with former managing editor Michael J. Coren (right) at the old office of The Post. Photo supplied
Fri, 7 July 2017

Breaking bread with the US feds

I remember the day in September 2001, perched on a big old desk in the office on Street 264 and lamenting to Rob Carmichael that I couldn’t find a good story for that week’s edition.

Campaigners for a now-defunct political party in the run up to the 2003 elections. Photo supplied
Fri, 7 July 2017

Who is the current King of Cambodia?

Michael Hayes never wanted to hire me. He had too many interns already, he told me when I pitched up at The Phnom Penh Post office in the summer of 2002, and one of them did not even know the name of the King.

PM Hun Sen (left) and FUNCINPEC leader Prince Norodom Ranariddh (right) talk at a Congress ceremony at the FUNCINPEC headquarters in Phnom Penh on March 1999. Rob Elliottt/AFP
Fri, 7 July 2017

Flag bearing journalism from 1992

When I first arrived in Cambodia in September 1993, one of my favorite pastimes was watching young newspaper sellers play a game with their flip-flops on the sidewalks of Phnom Penh.

Among the 20 political parties who competed in the 1993 national elections was the Republic Democracy Khmer Party, whose slogan was 'Communism is Evil'. Sara Colm
Fri, 7 July 2017

A night at the bar, a leap of faith

For one of The Post’s early alums, a leap of faith from the risky world of freelancing to the even riskier world of a fledgling newspaper started with a casual introduction on a hotel veranda: “This is Michael. He’s going to start the first English-language newspaper in Cambodia.” It was January 1992. Two men were drinking and talking in their rattan chairs on the veranda of the Renakse Hotel, and invited me over. One of them, Nate, introduced the other to me by saying: “This is Michael. He’s going to start the first English-language newspaper in Cambodia.” A few conversations later I found myself in the managing editor’s chair of The Phnom Penh Post.

Milton Osborne (right), then 24, with his friend Prince Sisowath Phandaravong at the Queen’s Birthday reception in July 1961.
Fri, 7 July 2017

Saluting Michael Hayes and The Phnom Penh Post

Milton Osbourne, one of the Kingdom’s pre-eminent historians, recalls a time when The Post was one of the few windows onto Cambodian affairs, and when an annual sit-down with founder Michael Hayes was a

Vote counting during the 2013 national elections.
Fri, 7 July 2017

The Phnom Penh Post - custodian of Cambodian history

I shouldn’t be surprised if, after a perusal of its old issues, a researcher says that The Phnom Penh Post is a chronicle of events that have been unfolding in Cambodia since the 1992 arrival of the United Nations Transitio

The Phnom Penh Post’s acting editor-in-chief Stuart White speaks to reporters and editors during a morning news meeting.
Fri, 7 July 2017

We lead where it matters

With the exception of the tumultuous 1970s, it could be argued that the past 25 years of Cambodian history have seen more momentous changes than any other period since the nation won its independence in 1953. Since The Phnom Penh Post was founded in 1992, the country transitioned to a fledgling, albeit flawed, multi-party democracy; it finally closed the chapter on its decades-long civil war; and just last year, the World Bank upgraded Cambodia from a low-income country to a lower-middle income one.

Post Khmer editor-in-chief Kay Kimsong.
Fri, 7 July 2017

On a mission to educate Cambodia

Stepping into the office of Post Khmer editor-in-chief (EIC) Kay Kimsong, one would notice a framed picture of King Norodom Sihamoni on his coronation day, as well as portraits of ASEAN leaders, hanging on the walls. “We are one family. They make me feel like I’m living with over 600 million people,” he said. Kimsong started out as the chief of staff at The Post in 2008 before taking on the coveted EIC position in 2009. Prior to working at The Post, he spent a decade at The Cambodia Daily as a journalist. When asked about the major changes that have taken place in Cambodia over the past 25 years, he singled out three specific years: 1993, 1998 and 2000.