Search

Search form

Water, water everywhere

Arctic Life
Arctic Life. Ragnar Axelsson

Water, water everywhere

With displays along the riverside, the GreenLight series of exhibitions explores humanity’s deep and sometimes damaging relationship with one of our most precious resources, water.

Two of those exhibitions, which open formally this Saturday, on the last night of the Angkor Photo Festival, were submitted by Greenpeace. In The Coalification of Water and Inner Mongolia, the environmental organisation takes a look at the harm caused by the coal industry. “Obviously, Greenpeace demonises coal because of the climate,” said John Novis, head of photography at Greenpeace International.

“But there’s this lesser-known thing about water, and the way the industry consumes vast quantities of it before spewing it out again as pollution, creating a double-whammy for the environment, farming and local communities.”

Stark images of wasted, alien landscapes created by open strip mining, cows scratching for nourishment on degraded grasslands, and filthy water being pumped back into rivers are part of award-winning environmental photographer Lu Guang’s documentation of how the coal industry is destroying a once fertile region in Inner Mongolia.

Also on the riverside, The Last Days of the Arctic by Ragnar Axelsson is a haunting black and white homage to the communities who live and hunt on the dwindling Arctic landscape, their existence and way of life threatened by global warming and the fight over rights to rich resources.

Meanwhile, Lâm Duc Hiên takes us on a 4,200 kilometre journey along the Mekong from Vietnam to Tibet with The Mekong: Stories of Man. The exploration, which takes place over 15 years, looks at how that river shapes the lives of those who live alongside it.

The Greenpeace exhibitions open at 5pm, at the Raffles Riverside Gardens.

RECOMMENDED STORIES

  • Breaking: PM says prominent human rights NGO ‘must close’

    Prime Minister Hun Sen has instructed the Interior Ministry to investigate the Cambodian Center for Human Rights (CCHR) and potentially close it “because they follow foreigners”, appearing to link the rights group to the opposition Cambodia National Rescue Party's purported “revolution”. The CNRP - the

  • Rainsy and Sokha ‘would already be dead’: PM

    Prime Minister Hun Sen on Sunday appeared to suggest he would have assassinated opposition leaders Sam Rainsy and Kem Sokha had he known they were promising to “organise a new government” in the aftermath of the disputed 2013 national elections. In a clip from his speech

  • Massive ceremony at Angkor Wat will show ‘Cambodia not in anarchy’: PM

    Government officials, thousands of monks and Prime Minister Hun Sen himself will hold a massive prayer ceremony at Angkor Wat in early December to highlight the Kingdom’s continuing “peace, independence and political stability”, a spectacle observers said was designed to disguise the deterioration of

  • PM tells workers CNRP is to blame for any sanctions

    In a speech to workers yesterday, Prime Minister Hun Sen pinned the blame for any damage inflicted on Cambodia’s garment industry by potential economic sanctions squarely on the opposition party. “You must remember clearly that if the purchase orders are reduced, it is all