Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Clam sales surge on rising beef, chicken and pork prices

Clam sales surge on rising beef, chicken and pork prices

Clam sales surge on rising beef, chicken and pork prices

14-story-2.jpg
14-story-2.jpg

VANDY RATTANA

A clam vendor shows off the day’s catch at Prolok Bek market in Phnom Penh.

CLAM wholesalers have appealed to fishermen and shellfish raisers to increase production to satisfy the increasing demands of local and international customers.

"Clams have been selling well since the increase in the price of beef, pork, chicken and fish," said Chhim Thunny, a clam wholesaler in Trolork Bek village, Boeng Kak commune, Russey Keo district, Phnom Penh.

Surging food prices have left many Cambodians unable to afford meat products, forcing them to turn to cheaper alternatives.

"There are days when I don't have enough clams to meet the demand of my customers because the clam collectors from the sea haven't caught enough," he said.

"I usually order four tonnes of clams per day from the catchers in Kampot, Koh Kong and Sihanoukville for distribution nationwide, but usually only receive three tonnes," he said, adding that he is confident that he will be able to distribute four tonnes of clams per day.

Chhim Thunny said that with the boom in the clam market he can earn an average of US$200 per day.

"I buy clams from Kampot province for 2,800 riels per kilogram and sell them to vendors for 3,200 riels per kilogram and clams from Koh Kong province I buy for 4,000 riels per kilogram and sell for 4,500 riels."

Long Simach, 45, a vendor at Kantout Market, Siem Reap district, Kandal province, said clams have been selling well for the last couple of years.

"I sell about 150 kilograms of clams on weekdays and 250 kilograms on the weekend," she said, adding that most people eat them as an accompaniment to beer and wine.

Healthy demand

Veng Thai, director of Phnom Penh Municipal Heath Department, said while some people have linked eating clams to hypertension and skin disease, the ailments were not caused by clams.

"Eating clams can reduce fat and cholesterol," he said, adding that clams do not harm people with hypertension and skin allergies.

According to a report compiled by the Fisheries Administration, one Cambodian person consumes one kilogram of clams every three months, said Sam Nuov, deputy director of Fisheries Administration.

"The government is now trying to encourage shellfish raisers to increase shellfish breeding including lobsters," he said.

MOST VIEWED

  • US to ramp up sanctions after ‘flawed’ national polls

    At a press conference on Wednesday, the US State Department announced that it would expand visa sanctions on the Cambodian officials and individuals it deems responsible for “undermining democracy” in Cambodia. At the briefing, spokesperson Heather Nauert reiterated that the department regarded the July 29 elections

  • PM's Bodyguard commander hits back at US

    The commander of Prime Minister Hun Sen’s Bodyguard Unit (BGU) Hing Bun Heang on Sunday dismissed a short video clip that went viral on social media in which he says he is preparing for a war with the United States over its aggressiveness towards

  • Final poll results confirm first single-party Assembly

    IN an unprecedented situation in Cambodian politics, the official results of the July 29 national elections have declared that the Cambodian People’s Party (CPP) will take all 125 seats in the National Assembly on the back of it receiving 76 per cent of the votes. The National

  • Chinese influence to sweep Kingdom?

    Growing Cambodia-China ties have seen the latter’s influence sweep across the Kingdom through increased investments and tourism. The Asian giant has become the leading source of foreign funds in Cambodia, fuelling the construction sector with huge casino and hotel projects. Much of the growth