Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Key Thai opposition figure faces lese majeste charge



Key Thai opposition figure faces lese majeste charge

Content image - Phnom Penh Post
Thanathorn Juangroongruangkit, founder of the now-dissolved Future Forward Party. THE NATION/ASIA NEWS NETWORK

Key Thai opposition figure faces lese majeste charge

A Thai billionaire opposition figure was accused on January 20 of defaming the monarchy, a day after a court sentenced a former civil servant to more than 40 years in jail for lese majeste crimes.

Thanathorn Juangroongruangkit, founder of the now-dissolved Future Forward Party, was accused of contravening Thailand’s strict royal defamation laws by posting a video on January 18 criticising the government’s vaccine strategy.

In the video he raised questions about whether Thailand’s vaccination campaign is too reliant on Siam BioScience, which is owned by the Crown Property Bureau – a body that manages the royal family’s multi-billion-dollar fortune.

His video drew the ire of Thailand’s Ministry of Digital Economy and Society, which on January 20 filed a royal defamation complaint against him.

Ministry representative Tossapol Pengsom told reporters: “What Mr Thanathorn said is not the truth – the facts have been distorted.”

He said there were 11 instances in the video where the opposition figure allegedly insulted the monarchy, and the ministry would be file a complaint under the Computer Crimes Act.

The lese majeste law, referred to as “112” by its penal code section, is meant to shield the royal family from defamation, and carries sentences of between three to 15 years in jail per charge.

It has, however, been broadly interpreted to cover any perceived criticism of the monarchy, with some saying the law is also used to target government dissent.

On January 19, a court sentenced a former civil servant arrested in 2015 to more than 43 years in prison for disseminating audio clips deemed defamatory to the monarchy – the harshest punishment ever received.

The law’s use slowed in 2018, which Premier Prayut Chan-o-cha said was due to the “mercy” of the king.

But it returned in full force last year, in response to mass demonstrations staged by a pro-democracy movement calling for Prayut’s removal from office and – more controversially – for reforms to the unassailable monarchy.

So far, at least 43 protesters have been charged for their role in the protests.

The kingdom appears to now be going through a backlog of stalled lese majeste cases.

Thanathorn – who threw his support behind the movement when it started in mid-July – is the highest-profile target since the spike in the law’s use.

Political analyst Thitinan Pongsudirak of Chulalongkorn University said: “It means that the draconian law is in full swing and can be used indiscriminately.”

Thanathorn’s de facto spokesperson Pannika Wanich said it was “obvious” the law is was being deployed “aggressively against the government’s political enemies”.

Government spokesman Anucha Burapachaisri did not respond immediately for comment.

Before it was disbanded, Thanathorn’s Future Forward Party was Thailand’s third-largest, drawing millions of supporters who were attracted to his anti-establishment platform during the 2019 election.

But they were felled by swift legal action, which saw its top executives, including Thanathorn, banned from politics and the party dissolved.

MOST VIEWED

  • Purging Sihanoukville’s past with a new masterplan

    Amid illicit activities, haphazard development and abandoned projects, the coastal city of Sihanouk province needs a reset to move forward. A new masterplan might be the answer to shake off its seemingly mucky image to become the Shenzhen of the south Gun toting, shootouts, police

  • Chinese may be first in tourism revival: PM

    Cambodia's tourism industry is gearing up to roll out the red carpet for Chinese travellers after Prime Minister Hun Sen on September 17 indicated that the Kingdom could soon throw open its doors to international holidaymakers vaccinated against Covid-19 – starting with guests from China. Cambodia Chinese

  • 'Pursue your goals, reach out to me': Young diplomat tapped as envoy to South Korea

    Chring Botum Rangsay was a secretary of state at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation before being designated as the new Cambodian ambassador to South Korea. According to her official CV published on the foreign ministry’s website, she started her first government

  • Tourism concerns laid bare

    To ensure the success of plans to reopen the tourism market for international visitors, Cambodia must pay utmost attention to two primary determinants – the ongoing paradigm shift in domestic tourism services towards the ‘new normal’, and the factors influencing choices of destinations among foreign holidaymakers.

  • Covid jab drive for 6-11 age group to begin Sept 17

    Prime Minister Hun Sen has permitted Covid-19 vaccinations for over 1.8 million children aged 6-11 across the country from September 17 in order for them to return to school after a long hiatus. Hun Sen also hinted that vaccinations for the 3-6 age group will follow in

  • No ‘Crown Prince’ exists to buy France football club: ministry

    The Ministry of the Royal Palace has denied media reports that a Cambodian “Crown Prince” had purchased the AS Saint Etienne football club of France’s top-flight LIGUE 1 at the cost of €100 million ($117 million). In a press statement on September 19, the ministry stressed that Cambodia