Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - North Korean defector ‘is son of general’ report



North Korean defector ‘is son of general’ report

Content image - Phnom Penh Post
North Korea defector Oh Chong-song is seen running from a vehicle at the Korean DMZ on November 22, 2017, in a screengrab from video footage. UN COMMAND/AFP

North Korean defector ‘is son of general’ report

The North Korean soldier who defected to the South in a hail of bullets last year is a general’s son, but he says most Northerners of his age have no loyalty to Kim Jong-un, according to a Japanese newspaper.

Oh Chong-song’s dramatic dash across the border at the Panmunjom truce village in the Demilitarised Zone – under fire from his comrades – made global headlines last year, and saw him hospitalised with serious injuries.

It is very rare for the North’s troops to defect at Panmunjom, a major tourist attraction and the only place on the frontier where forces from the two sides come face to face.

The 25-year-old Oh is the son of a major-general, Japan’s Sankei Shimbun newspaper reported, in what it said was the defector’s first media interview. But despite his privileged birth – he described himself as “upper class” – he felt no allegiance to the North’s leadership.

“Inside the North, people, and especially the younger generation, are indifferent to each other, politics and their leaders, and there is no sense of loyalty.”

He was “indifferent” to the rule of Kim Jong-un, the third generation of the Kim family to lead the North, and had no interest in how his friends felt about it.

“Probably 80 per cent of my generation is indifferent and has no loyalty,” he was quoted as saying.

“It is natural to have no interest nor loyalty since the hereditary system is taken as a given, regardless of its inability to feed people.”

Oh denied media reports in the South that he was wanted for murder in the North.

After some unspecified trouble with friends, the Sankei said, he started drinking. On his way back to his post he broke through a checkpoint and, fearing execution, decided to keep going.

“I feared I could be executed if I went back, so I crossed the border,” he was quoted as saying, adding he had no regrets about defecting.

The newspaper said that Japanese intelligence officials had confirmed Oh’s identity.

A short clip posted by the Sankei Shimbun on its website shows him wearing a black jacket and a white top, speaking with a slight North Korean accent. His face is not revealed.

‘Heavy punishment’

Seoul’s unification ministry – which handles inter-Korean affairs including the resettlement of defectors – declined to comment on the interview and said it does not keep tabs on defectors after they are released from resettlement centres.

Lee Cook-jong, the South Korean doctor who treated Oh, told a radio interview last month that the defector had secured a job and bought a car, adding he had nearly lost his North Korean accent.

The geopolitical landscape around the Korean peninsula has shifted dramatically since last year when US President Donald Trump threatened to rain “fire and fury” on the nuclear-armed North Korea.

“I really felt that we were on the verge of war with the US,” Oh was quoted as saying. “The tension [that I felt] trickled down from the top.”

Now a rapid rapprochement has taken hold on the peninsula and troops in the border truce village where he defected are to be disarmed.

Oh said he understands the former comrades who shot him.

“If they didn’t shoot they would face heavy punishment,” he said. “If I was them, I would have done the same.”

MOST VIEWED

  • Kingdom's Covid cluster cases jump to 194

    The Ministry of Health on February 25 confirmed 65 new cases of Covid-19, with 58 linked to the February 20 community transmission. The latest cluster cases include nine Vietnamese nationals, five Cambodians, one each from Korea, Singapore and Japan, with the rest being Chinese. This brings the total number

  • Locations shut, dozens more Covid-19 positive

    The Ministry of Health has closed 23 locations in connection with the February 20 community transmission of Covid-19 and summoned for testing anyone who had direct contact with affected people and places. The number of discovered related infections has risen to 76, including 39 women. In a press release,

  • Cambodia's Covid cluster cases rise to 137

    The Ministry of Health on February 24 recorded 40 more cases of Covid-19, with 38 linked to the February 20 community transmission. Of the 40, two are imported cases involving Chinese passengers. The 38 include two Vietnamese nationals and one Cambodian, with the rest being Chinese. This brings the total cases

  • Covid cluster raises alarm, health bodies urge vigilance

    The Ministry of Health and the World Health Organisation (WHO) in Cambodia have expressed great concern over the February 20 cluster transmission of Covid-19 in the community. Both entities appealed for vigilance and cooperation in curbing further spread of the virus. Ministry spokeswoman Or Vandine said

  • PM confirms third Covid-19 community transmission

    Prime Minister Hun Sen on February 20 announced the Kingdom's third outbreak of Covid-19 community transmission after 32 people tested positive in just over 10 hours. Addressing the public from his residence after an emergency meeting, Hun Sen said: "I dub it February 20 Community Event, in which 32 cases

  • Cambodia to make auto-rickshaws

    Locally-assembled electric auto-rickshaws could hit the Cambodian market as soon as early in May after the Council for the Development of Cambodia (CDC) gave the greenlight to an investment project at the weekend. According to a CDC press release, it will issue a final registration