Bangladesh's war crimes tribunal

Bangladesh's war crimes tribunal

A Bangladeshi nationalist mural in Dhaka (Sebastian Strangio).

The Post's own Sebastian Strangio has a piece in The Diplomat about Bangladesh's nascent efforts to address alleged atrocities committed during the country's 1971 liberation war against Pakistan. While no trial dates have been set, two leading politicians from the Islamist Jamaat-e-Islami party were arrested last month; others, including party president Motiur Rahman Nizami, were detained in June. With Jamaat's 10 million followers and its support from the Islamic world, however, some fear that the prosecutions could provoke social unrest. There is also the challenge, just as at the ECCC, of investigating events that took place decades ago. Still, many - such as Mahbub Alam, general manager of Dhaka's Liberation War Museum - are cautiously optimistic:

 

In spite of the political machinations surrounding the trials, Alam expresses hope that they will at least see some manner of justice done. ‘In this country, if you go into each and every village you will find war victims,’ he says.

He says that for most Bangladeshis, the desire for vengeance is less important than the desire to see justice done: ‘I don’t expect that these gentlemen should be hanged, but the gentlemen should be tried,’ he says. ‘I’d like to see it in my lifetime.’

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