Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Mooncakes for diabetics

Mooncakes for diabetics

Mooncakes for diabetics

120927_17b
A woman holds a box of mooncakes at Aspara bakery in Phnom Penh. A box of four costs $10. Photograph: Chhim Sreyneang/Phnom Penh Post

A woman holds a box of mooncakes at Aspara bakery in Phnom Penh. A box of four costs $10. Photograph: Chhim Sreyneang/Phnom Penh Post

As Cambodians gear up to celebrate the Chinese moon festival this Sunday, the streets and boulevards of Phnom Penh are crammed with red boothes competing to sell mooncakes and lanterns.

The Kingdom’s residents will celebrate the Chinese holiday this weekend by snacking on the sweet pastries filled with bean paste and yolked together with duck egg.

But one big bakery has taken a creative approach, beating the competition and selling the sugarly, 1,000-calorie treats – offering a diabetic alternative.

In response to the large percentage of the population who suffer from the condition, and more who fear developing it, Apsara bakery in Phnom Penh has created a special version for the festival.

There are some 300,000 people with diabetes in Cambodia, according to the Ministry of Health. But the number could be far higher, say doctors at International SOS, given the total of those who have not yet been diagnosed.

Chan Angkeara, deputy general manager of Apsara bakery, said she had thought about making diabetic cakes as long as six years ago but this year is the first year the shop started producing the cakes.

“In Cambodia, there are many people suffering from diabetes – especially elderly people. They want to eat mooncakes, but their children stop them from buying them, saying they’re too sweet and unhealthy. So we started to make special cakes to cater to the demand from diabetic patients.”

Angkeara imports sugar from Singapore suitable for people with diabetes to make the cakes, which are sold in boxes of four for $10 and have proved popular with customers.

“In our country, many people suffer from this disease. The shop is clever to make this kind of cake so that patients can also enjoy it.”

Song Leap, a shopowner from Russian Market and a regular customer at Apsara, said that the new snack has allowed his 69-year old diabetic father to eat the cakes again with warm tea – a favourite ritual before he developed the condition.

To contact the reporter on this story: Chhim Sreyneang at [email protected]

MOST VIEWED

  • Cambodia maintains 'Kun Khmer' stance despite Thailand’s boycott threat

    Cambodia has taken the position that it will use the term "Kun Khmer" to refer to the sport of kickboxing at the upcoming Southeast Asian (SEA) Games, and has removed the term Muay from all references to the sport. Despite strong reactions from the Thai

  • Artificial insemination takes herd from 7 to 700

    Some farms breed local cows or even import bulls from a broad for the purpose of breeding heavier livestock for meat production. One Tbong Khnum farmer has found a more efficient way. Hout Leang employs artificial insemination to fertilise local cows. Thanks to imported “straws”

  • Chinese group tours return to Cambodia starting Feb 6

    Cambodia is among 20 countries selected by Beijing for a pilot programme allowing travel agencies to provide international group tours as well as flight and hotel packages to Chinese citizens, following a three-year ban. As the days tick down until the programme kicks off on February 6,

  • Capital-Poipet express rail project making headway

    The preliminary results of a feasibility study to upgrade the Phnom Penh-Poipet railway into Cambodia’s first express railway indicate that the project would cost more than $4 billion and would take around four years to complete. The study was carried out by China Road and

  • Thai boxers to join SEA Games’ Kun Khmer event

    The Cambodian SEA Games Organising Committee (CAMSOC) – together with the Kun Khmer International Federation (KKIF) and Khmer Boxing Federation – have achieved a “great success” by including Kun Khmer in the upcoming biennial multi-sports event on its home soil for the first time, said a senior

  • Bullets to bracelets: Siem Reap man makes waste from war wearable

    Jewellery is often made from valuable gemstones like emeralds or diamonds and precious metals like gold or silver, or valueless things like animal horns. But a man in Siem Reap has approached the manufacture of delicate pieces from a different angle. His unique form of