Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Turkish party train blazes through night



Turkish party train blazes through night

Content image - Phnom Penh Post
Passengers of the Eastern Express train have dinner in the restaurant on the train near Ankara on January 5. AFP

Turkish party train blazes through night

Festive garlands, white tablecloths and enticing bottles appear the moment passengers board the Eastern Express for an epic journey across Turkey’s snow-capped Euphrates plateaus.

Named the Turistik Dogu Ekspresi locally, the train offers one of the expansive country’s most coveted new experiences.

Its nine carriages wind their way around mountain bends on a 32-hour, 1,300km voyage from the capital Ankara to Kars, an ancient city near Turkey’s rugged border with Armenia and Georgia.

The service was suspended less than a year after starting because of the coronavirus pandemic. But with restrictions easing, the sleeper is back. Tickets, though relatively pricey, are snapped up in minutes.

“The Ankara-Kars line is considered by travel writers to be one of the four most beautiful train lines in the world,” Turkish State Railways director Hasan Pezuk said.

“It is really a very special moment for me and my family,” says Zulan-Nour Komurcu, 26, who is celebrating her birthday with them on board.

“It’s my present,” smiles the brunette, who has decorated her cabin with purple lights, hung a furry wreath on the door and set out biscuits and a porcelain teapot on an embroidered tablecloth.

Three months of snow

The train runs twice a week from December 30 to March 31 to make the most of the snow-covered landscapes. Its route is a miniature version of Russia’s Trans-Siberian railway, says engineer Fatih Yalcin.

“There is always something to fix,” he says, his head deep inside an electrical cabinet.

“[The previous] week it was minus 24 degrees Celsius . . . The water was freezing,” he says, adding that it sometimes falls to minus 40.

“I intervene when required and without disturbing the passengers. Seeing them happy is a real pleasure for me.”

Depending on the compartment, there are prayers or alcohol.

In the dining car, revellers can feast through the night under a nightclub-style mirror ball.

This is where Ilhemur Irmak and her retired friends meet for tea as the sun sets in a blaze of colour. The 40 women hail from Bursa, a western province on the Sea of Marmara.

Content image - Phnom Penh Post
The Eastern Express train passes through snowy landscape near Ilic train station on January 6. AFP

“We’re in retreat from our husbands and our fathers,” says Irmak, triggering laughter all round.

Like most passengers, they embarked with their own provisions: a veritable feast of specialities and sweets.

Another faster and less festive train runs along the same route in around 20 hours, without the scenic stops.

But this train was designed for the sheer joy of travelling through spectacular but hard-to-access provinces such as Kayseri, Sivas, Erzincan and Erzurum.

And, of course, for partying through the night.

Nostalgia

Lawyer Yoruk Giris and his two friends have made sure their supplies last until the end. A party animal, he has brought out a white light garland, a plaster snowman, candles and a portable speaker blasting out Turkish rock.

“It was an old dream,” the smiling 38-year-old says, swaying, his table weighed down by whisky, delicacies and chilled beers.

“We had to make something joyful out of it. We prepared a lot.”

As the evening turns to night, people begin meeting up in the corridor to share music and dance. Among them, two couples in their fifties, “friends since high school”, intend to “have a good time together”.

One of them, Ahmet Cavus, admits feeling “nostalgia” for the train rides of his youth.

“We revisit the journeys we made as children with our grandparents,” Cavus says.

The train brings together an array of Turkish society, with people of all ages and styles, from the reserved to the unrestrained.

In Erzurum, the last stop before Kars at an altitude of 1,945m, several passengers perform a traditional dance on the frozen platform, with backing from the tea vendor’s crackling radio.

The station’s thermometer shows minus 11 degrees Celsius but no one looks discouraged.

Resigned, the train conductor delays the departure for Kars with a smile, waving his torch in rhythm.

MOST VIEWED

  • Hong Kong firm done buying Coke Cambodia

    Swire Coca-Cola Ltd, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Hong Kong-listed Swire Pacific Ltd, on November 25 announced that it had completed the acquisition of The Coca-Cola Co’s bottling business in Cambodia, as part of its ambitions to expand into the Southeast Asian market. Swire Coca-Cola affirmed

  • Cambodia's Bokator now officially in World Heritage List

    UNESCO has officially inscribed Cambodia’s “Kun Lbokator”, commonly known as Bokator, on the World Heritage List, according to Minister of Culture and Fine Arts Phoeurng Sackona in her brief report to Prime Minister Hun Sen on the night of November 29. Her report, which was

  • NagaWorld union leader arrested at airport after Australia trip

    Chhim Sithar, head of the Labour Rights Supported Union of Khmer Employees at NagaWorld integrated casino resort, was arrested on November 26 at Phnom Penh International Airport and placed in pre-trial detention after returning from a 12-day trip to Australia. Phnom Penh Municipal Court Investigating Judge

  • Sub-Decree approves $30M for mine clearance

    The Cambodian government established the ‘Mine-Free Cambodia 2025 Foundation’, and released an initial budget of $30 million. Based on the progress of the foundation in 2023, 2024 and 2025, more funds will be added from the national budget and other sources. In a sub-decree signed by Prime Minister Hun Sen

  • Two senior GDP officials defect to CPP

    Two senior officials of the Grassroots Democratic Party (GDP) have asked to join the Cambodian People’s Party (CPP), after apparently failing to forge a political alliance in the run-up to the 2023 general election. Yang Saing Koma, chairman of the GDP board, and Lek Sothear,

  • 11th Chaktomuk Short Film Festival draws to close

    Cambodia's 11th Chaktomuk Short Film Festival wrapped up successfully on November 28 after a four-day run, with the film “Voice of the Night” awarded top prize for 2022. Sum Sithen, the organiser of the short film festival, told The Post that the number of attendees to the