A day in the life​: driving teacher & radio host

A day in the life​: driving teacher & radio host

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Before drivers can take to the road, they need to learn the rules of the road. This brings tonnes of new students to driving school every year.

Experienced driving teachers explain traffic laws and give these young motorists the right tools to get started on the road. Sor Kane, 33-years-old, goes above and beyond and shares his knowledge of driving every-day through two popular radio programs.  

I went to meet Sor Kane this week at ABC Cambodia Radio, in Phnom Penh.

He first started as a driving teacher in 2002. He took up studying at the General Department of Public Transportation, and then worked as an instructor for eight years. In 2010, he landed a gig as a radio host and has been working at ABC Cambodia Radio since.

“Even though I changed from teaching to going on the radio, I still have the same goal – to share knowledge about traffic and make the roads a safer place,” he said.

One of Sor Kane’s programs is Traffic for All Citizens, on ABC Cambodia Radio from 3am to 6am. The other is Traffic Safety All Together, which is broadcast on traffic radio 94.5 FM from 5pm to 6:30pm.

Both of his programs are open to callers with any questions they might have.

“Listeners of all ages can call in and ask me any question about traffic or traffic-related issues. Also, they can share their experiences about travelling on the roads, too,” he said.

Sor Kane said he has had a relatively easy and smooth time while on the radio. Although he gets a lot of questions, he said that his experience and training allows for him to give great answers.

Sor Kane is also content with his work on the radio. “I’m really happy when I teach everyone about traffic laws, and how they can drive safely,” he said. “My work may not be too important, but it can make a difference on the road.”

To stay fresh and updated on traffic regulations, Sor Kane continues to take tutorials at the General Department of Public Transportation.

“I don’t want anyone to get confused about the traffic law in Cambodia,” he said.

Sor Kane may not have his entire future planned out, but he knows that his goal is to make the road a better and safer place.

“Over the next year, the country will develop and traffic will become more complicated. I think that everyone will face some difficulties while travelling,” he said.

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