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A day in the life of a product contributor

A day in the life of a product contributor


Studying and finding fun things to do with spare time is what most youths do to occupy themselves. However, life isn’t so relaxed for some.

Khin Sarak, 20, works every day to support his family.

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Sarak has worked in many different jobs, and his hard effort paid off - he has established a small business in product contribution.

On Wednesday, we went and spent nearly half a day with Sarak in order to understand his daily life.

He first worked as a gardener and a housekeeper for a foreign expat, before working at GM Company as a cosmetic seller for a year.

He then decided he wanted to have his own business and has worked towards his goal, learning the tricks of the trade and gaining experience and networks.

“No one wants to work under other people forever, so I thought working for myself was the best option,” Sarak said.

Every-day, as a product contributor, Sarak finds the products that his customers want, and delivers those products to the customers.

He also checks the products that he imports for his customers to make sure they’re up to standard.

“The new products need to be acceptable because that is what the customer wants, so I try to find the best quality product for them.”

In the morning and evening, Sarak delivers his goods to his customers’ shops, markets, and restaurants. But, he admits he is sometimes confronted with difficulties.

“The products are not stored regularly. So my customer may order a product but there is none left in stock,” Sarak said.

In order to solve the problem, Sarak found another way to keep his customers satisfied. He sometimes searches the markets in Phnom Penh to provide a quick service.

“Even though the price is higher than the price I would pay to import it, I have to do it to keep my permanent customers satisfied.”

Another difficulty Sarak faces is finding new customers. He has to convince potential customers that he is reliable, and that his products are of good quality.

“It is not easy to make someone believe in my products because people have different tastes. If I meet people in a good mood, it is better. But if they are not satisfied with my products, they not only stop buying from me, they also hurl abusive language at me.”

Despite these obstacles, Sarak is satisfied and content with his job.

“Nowadays, I have enough freedom and independence. I don’t have to endure any pressure from anyone, and comparing the salary from the company I used to work at to what I get now, the profit is roughly the same.”

Now Sarak is focusing on improving his business. He is currently in his third-year of studying at the Institute of Economics and Finance.

In the future, Sarak hopes to open another new business in a different field.

“Although it is difficult for me, I think according to my abilities and experiences, I’ll hopefully make my goal a reality.”

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