An expert’s guide to good aquaculture

Content image - Phnom Penh Post

An expert’s guide to good aquaculture

Professor Hout Vutha, vice dean at the Faculty of Fisheries at the Royal University of Agriculture, has specialised in aquaculture since 1991. The problems Leang Roath expressed with his aquaculture are known to the professor and he has some solutions.

“Water quality is very important in aquaculture,” the professor said, adding: “If there are a lot of fish in the pond, enough fresh water has to be pumped in and out.”

The aquaculture specialist explained that water quality also depends on the type of fish in the pond. He gave an example: “Striped catfish can survive in dirty or turbid water, while Nile tilapia and silver carp need clean water.”

Clean water, however, is not to be confused with tap water but water with enough oxygen. “When we see green water it doesn’t mean that the water is dirty. It can look cloudy from plankton,” Vutha said.

In terms of fish food, the professor said that fish pond owners have to think about quality rather than price if they want their fish to grow faster. “We have to understand that some food is expensive; the protein level is higher which makes the fish grow faster.”

He added that fish breeders could also mix the food by themselves but must first understand the right doses of vitamins and other nutrients.

Plankton is also a good food for fish, but again the type of plankton fed has to match the type of fish. “Fish like striped catfish are carnivorous so they need animal plankton, while fish like Nile tilapia and silver carp feed on plants so they need both animal plankton and plant plankton.”

Though plankton can be a good food source for fish, pond owners have to make sure to stay in control of the plankton growth in the pond. “At day time, the oxygen created by plankton increases, but at night oxygen levels drop,” he explained, adding that “at night, the plankton absorbs the oxygen and releases carbon dioxide into the water, which is poisonous to the fish.”

To Roath’s concern about protecting fish from being caught by other people, the professor said he was not in a position to comment on the problem saying that “it’s the responsibility of a pond owner”.

With enough water resources already available in the country, Vutha recommended Cambodian people, especially farmers, start breeding fish on their rice farms as well. “My message is to suggest that they breed fish in their existing farms,” he said, concluding: “It is always very important to find ways to fight poverty in the countryside.”

MOST VIEWED

  • US to ramp up sanctions after ‘flawed’ national polls

    At a press conference on Wednesday, the US State Department announced that it would expand visa sanctions on the Cambodian officials and individuals it deems responsible for “undermining democracy” in Cambodia. At the briefing, spokesperson Heather Nauert reiterated that the department regarded the July 29 elections

  • PM's Bodyguard commander hits back at US

    The commander of Prime Minister Hun Sen’s Bodyguard Unit (BGU) Hing Bun Heang on Sunday dismissed a short video clip that went viral on social media in which he says he is preparing for a war with the United States over its aggressiveness towards

  • Final poll results confirm first single-party Assembly

    IN an unprecedented situation in Cambodian politics, the official results of the July 29 national elections have declared that the Cambodian People’s Party (CPP) will take all 125 seats in the National Assembly on the back of it receiving 76 per cent of the votes. The National

  • Chinese influence to sweep Kingdom?

    Growing Cambodia-China ties have seen the latter’s influence sweep across the Kingdom through increased investments and tourism. The Asian giant has become the leading source of foreign funds in Cambodia, fuelling the construction sector with huge casino and hotel projects. Much of the growth