Second-hand item, brand new value

Second-hand item, brand new value

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Today, tonnes of young Cambodians are flocking in droves to second-hand shops for clothes, shoes, belts, bags and more.

Meas Kompheak, the manager of Number 1 Men’s Clothes Shop (branch three), said: “The number of customers who buy clothes [from this second-hand shop] is increasing, especially compared the past three years.”

Kompheak explained that the trend is on the rise due to the high quality of his shop’s second-hand items, especially imported shoes that would otherwise be too expensive.

He said the items in his store are imports from Korea and Japan that are suitably priced for Cambodian consumers.

“Even super stars are buying second-hand clothes from the shop,” Kompheak said.

Nip Piseth, a 21-year-old student and avid second-hand clothes consumer, said, “I like second-hand material because it’s good quality and usually lasts three or four years.”

“Also, I save money because it’s cheaper, but I can still buy quality items – just as good as new items that cost hundreds of dollars – and enjoy it.”

Piseth has been buying second-hand clothes for the past three years.

Second-hand items tend to be more varied and unique than new items – which also attracts the Cambodian youth demographic.

“Most second-hand clothes are good brand-names, such as Levi and Evisu,” said 23-year-old Meas Chamroeun. “If they were new it would be too expensive, so as a student I enjoy saving money by buying those brands second-hand.”

“Buying clothes second-hand is a better choice,” he added.

Chamroeun said that he can barely tell the difference in quality between new clothes and second-hand clothes.

With the popularity of second-hand items in the past three years, however, prices on the items are increasing.

Seang Meng Kheang, who’s been selling second-hand clothes at Central Market for four years, said, “Every year, the number of customers buying items such as shoes and belts increases.”

“At the same time, the number of shops selling second-hand items is increasing – and, prices at these shops are now more expensive than before,” he said.

Kheang added that second-hand stores now have to consider competition, and are looking to import second-hand items from developed countries in order to provide consumers with the best quality items possible.

According to Kheang, most second-hand shops are receiving their imported items from Korea, Hong Kong and sometimes Taiwan.

Kheng usually receives his shipments from businessmen in Poipet, where he chooses the best items available.

Buying second-hand clothes is a skyrocketing trend among today’s fashionable young Cambodians. To check out some great second-hand stores, have a look around BKK Market.

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