What young people want from the parties they vote for

What young people want from the parties they vote for

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Om Ratha, 23, of Phnom Penh

“I vote for the party that I see with leaders who consider all the important benefits, and offer the citizens development on the whole without having an effect on poor citizens. The party of my heart must be able to develop infrastructure and schools in the whole country because they are a vessel for commerce and development. Moreover, that party must be able to maintain nationalism and protect our territory, ancestral legacy and natural resources for the next generations.”

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Thou Pheakdey, 30, of Phnom Penh

“I vote for the party that has the policy of taking care of citizens, managing national crises and bringing development. Meanwhile, this party must have the ability to help citizens, especially youths, to all get jobs in their home country. On the other hand, those jobs must offer appropriate salaries to any class of Khmer citizen, so they can live in better conditions with dignity and without any financial pressures.”

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Om Daraarun, 24, of Kampong Cham province

“In response to the political situation in Cambodia nowadays, I decided to vote for the party that has very clear and strong policies in order to develop the country. And the leader and members of that party are really able to follow their political policies correctly. If they don’t follow what they promise, I and other citizens are also able to change them. Importantly, they must be able to commit to anti-corruption because corruption hinders development in Cambodian society.”

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Van Chanthoeurn, 21, of Kandal province

“The party that gets my vote has the Khmer leader who has never been controlled by any foreign country. Importantly, that party has very strong policies that guarantee the protection of Cambodian territory and have the ability to deal with any territorial issue with neighbouring countries peacefully. The party of my hope can also take action against illegal immigration to our country, because those immigrants are taking jobs from Khmer citizens while having complete rights as Khmer citizens.”

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Eung Thida, 23, of Siem Reap province

“The party that I am hopeful and confident for must contain the leader with knowledge, skills, and experience in order to develop the country. And members of the party must have many human resources with abilities to help the leader. I hope that this party will bring high standards of education to Cambodia as neighbouring countries have because nowadays, we admit that our educational system is very poor, and leads most students to becoming unemployed after graduation.”

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