Young Cambodians and MTV Exit educate local communities

Young Cambodians and MTV Exit educate local communities

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Young Cambodians team up with to bring a vital message to the rural provinces. MTV EXIT Photograph: Phnom Penh Post

With the torrential monsoons and harsh sunrays in Cambodia, it’s no wonder motor vehicles look weather-beaten in no time.

These days, refurbishing your bike to look like the latest model is easy. When it comes to giving your set of wheels a fresh coat of paint, there are cheap options.

MTV EXIT, a non-profit campaign project against human trafficking, is training Cambodian youths to take community-based action and bring the message to rural provinces.

They have organised roadshows featuring the documentary, Enslaved: An MTV EXIT Special, and performances by popular Cambodia rapper and MTV EXIT Roadshow ambassador, PouKhlaing.

“MTV EXIT Roadshows bring our educational programming to communities that need it most,” explained Roadshow coordinator Adam Sharpe. “These provincial areas often have limited access to information and many do not know about the dangers of human trafficking.”

MTV EXIT organises training sessions for local youths between 18 and 25 years old to raise awareness through art, drama, social media and community events.

“We want the next generation of Cambodians to understand the issue and have the skills and motivation to spread important prevention messaging in their local communities,” said Sharpe.

Trained youths from Prey Veng, such as 19-year-old Phors Ma, have started organising classes and personal visits in the community, given its increasing rate of migration.

“We don’t want to tell people not to migrate. We just want to help prevent migrants from being tricked or put in a dangerous situation,” said Phor.

“Showing them a documentary like Enslaved: An MTV EXIT Special is much more impactful because it highlights real stories of Cambodian human trafficking survivors,” he added.

Sharpe believes that young Cambodians like Phors Veng are role models for youth across Cambodia and the entire region.

“Our awareness-raising activities do not require expensive materials or advanced skills,“ he said. “With proper education and motivation, all young people can help put the issue of human trafficking at the forefront of public attention in Cambodia – where we feel it needs to be.”

For more details about human trafficking and exploitation in Asia, visit www.mtvexit.org or follow MTV EXIT on [email protected] and www.facebook.com/mtvexit

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