Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Anti-smoking stand brings laurels for Cyclo Center

Anti-smoking stand brings laurels for Cyclo Center

Anti-smoking stand brings laurels for Cyclo Center

anti.jpg
anti.jpg

Cyclo driver Korng Sinuch, center, surrounded by jubilant colleagues, proudly holds the certificate of appreciation presented with the World Health Organization Smoke-Free award to the Phnom Penh Cyclo Center in recognition of the work the center has done since 1999 towards promoting tobacco-free living. The center supports about 2000 drivers, 90 percent of whom smoked in 2001. This has now dropped by 50 percent as a result of the center's campaign. Cyclo drivers who smoke spend an average of 13 percent of their income on tobacco.

A

s promotion of tobacco smoking enjoys what health authorities are calling a "boom"

in Cambodia, the Phnom Penh Cyclo Center has been recognized for its efforts to promote

smoke-free living.

WHO gave its first-ever regional community project award to the center on June 9.

The center has been supporting cyclo drivers to live healthier lifestyles since 1999

and in April it ran a Smoke-Free Cyclo Rally from Siem Reap to the capital.

Greg Hallen, WHO's technical officer for tobacco control, said the center's Smoke-Free

Cyclo Project was an outstanding example of a community-based project focused on

breaking the cycle of tobacco use and poverty.

The center's smoking awareness project was established in conjunction with the National

Center for Health Promotion (NCHP) of the Ministry of Health and promotes smoke-free

lives, provides counselling, cessation support, and incentives to own a smoke-free

cyclo.

WHO said in a media statement that the multi-national tobacco industry had extended

its marketing to developing countries to make profits from poor people; it predicted

70 percent of deaths related to tobacco smoking would occur in developing countries

in the future.

A 1999 survey by the National Institute of Statistics found that 59 percent of Cambodian

men over 20 years were smoking and seven percent of women. The poorest people in

Phnom Penh spent an average of 7.4 percent of their income on tobacco.

NCHP said cyclo drivers who smoke spend an average of 13 percent of their income

on tobacco.

WHO said 123 countries had signed and 18 countries had ratified the Framework Convention

on Tobacco Control which aims to reduce deaths and disease caused by the global expansion

of the tobacco industry.

Cambodia had signed the convention on May 25, 2003, but ratification by the National

Assembly was delayed due to the current political deadlock.

Hallen said that countries such as Thailand, Myanmar, Malaysia, Vietnam and Laos

had banned tobacco advertising, but not Cambodia.

Lim Thaipheang, director of NCHP, said the deadlock had prevented the adoption of

many laws, including the draft law to control tobacco which would allow the Ministry

of Health to increase tobacco import taxes and control advertising. He said that

currently cigarette advertising and promotion was enjoying a boom and there was no

law to regulate it.

More than 200 brands of cigarette are imported into Cambodia and there are 17 factories

manufacturing smoking products.

MOST VIEWED

  • Two luxury hotels latest quarantine options for inbound travellers

    The Inter-Ministerial Committee to Combat Covid-19 has designated two luxury hotels as alternative quarantine options for travellers who wish to enter Cambodia through Phnom Penh International Airport – Sokha Phnom Penh Hotel & Residence and the Courtyard by Marriott Phnom Penh. In a notice detailing guidelines issued

  • Visa A holders get to quarantine at Himawari Hotel

    The Ministry of Health has permitted foreign diplomats, UN and International NGO officials to undergo quarantine at Himawari Hotel in the capital in case they do not have a separate place suitable for this purpose, but the government would not be responsible for the expenses.

  • Jabs for kids bring hope for school reopenings

    Cambodia is tentatively planning to reopen schools – at least at the secondary level – when the vaccination of children aged 12-17 is completed, even though daily transmissions and deaths in other age groups remain high. Schools across the country have been suspended since March 20, one month

  • China denies Mekong hacking

    As the US and its allies joined hands last week to expose what they allege to be China’s Ministry of State Security’s malicious cyber activities around the world, the attention also turned to Cambodia with the US Department of Justice claiming that four

  • Governor: Covid subsides in capital

    Phnom Penh municipal governor Khuong Sreng said the Covid-19 situation in the capital’s 14 districts has eased, with only two districts still recording a high number of infections. “Transmission cases in all districts are dropping, though they are relatively higher Meanchey and Por Sen Chey.

  • Hun Sen: Get 12-17 age group ready for Covid jabs

    Prime Minister Hun Sen has told parents of children aged 12-17 in Phnom Penh and the provinces of Kandal and Preah Sihanouk to get them ready for vaccinations soon. “There is a need to vaccinate children and youths aged 12 to 17. According to the statistics provided