Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Bank job's small return

Bank job's small return

Bank job's small return

B EING one of the country's top professional women doesn't necessarily mean that one will be laughing all the way to the bank.

At least, National Bank of Cambodia's Deputy Governor Tioulong Saumura doesn't seem to think so.

She says her job is 24 hour-a-day, 100 percent involvement with little opportunity for leisure.

Sam Rainsy's wife spoke frankly about her work in an interview with the Post.

She said: "I can't really say how many hours I spend working at the bank. It's an ongoing job and since I never switch off my mobile phone I'm always busy.

"Sometimes I wish I were more like my husband. Once he decides that enough is enough and that he wants to relax then he completely shuts out all outside interference.

"He relaxes by playing with his organ or reading Thai novels. I can't do that. Maybe it has something to do with the fact that I'm a woman.

"I only get about three to four hours sleep a night. I am terribly conscientious about my work and my children are also a priority.

Saumura said: "As deputy governor of the National Bank of Cambodia, I earn a monthly salary of 100,000 riels. That's about $40.

"Of course, I can't live on that and I don't actually take the money. I share it between my two secretaries who work long hours and are unable to take on a second job to supplement their income. My husband does the same thing with his salary.

"We are both living off our savings. When I lived in France, I worked for Indosuez Bank and used to be a director of Fleming [an investment bank].

"Any money I made was invested in real estate and I am also living off dividends on shares I own. I shall probably have to sell a small apartment in France to help with living expenses."

Though Saumura is more comfortably off than most Cambodians she is acutely aware of the ethical problems lowly-paid public servants encounter.

"If you were earning $20 a month and had five children and a wife to feed, what would you do? How does one escape the vicious circle? It's hard to do," she said.

"The best way to fight corruption is through economic growth.

"That way people will come to realize that it is not necessary to be corrupt. Cambodians have not lost all sense of moral values. It comes and goes, it's cyclical. Now everything rests on private investment."

MOST VIEWED

  • WHO: Covid in Cambodia goes into new phase

    The World Health Organisation (WHO) in Cambodia said that Cambodia has reached a new phase of the pandemic with “decreasing case numbers, high vaccination coverage and a more transmissible circulating variant threatening a hidden surge”. In a press release on September 6, the WHO said that

  • Purging Sihanoukville’s past with a new masterplan

    Amid illicit activities, haphazard development and abandoned projects, the coastal city of Sihanouk province needs a reset to move forward. A new masterplan might be the answer to shake off its seemingly mucky image to become the Shenzhen of the south Gun toting, shootouts, police

  • 'Pursue your goals, reach out to me': Young diplomat tapped as envoy to South Korea

    Chring Botum Rangsay was a secretary of state at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation before being designated as the new Cambodian ambassador to South Korea. According to her official CV published on the foreign ministry’s website, she started her first government

  • International air visitor arrivals dip 93%

    The number of foreign tourists entering Cambodia through the Kingdom’s three international airports witnessed a sharp 92.5 per cent year-on-year decline in the first seven months of this year, according to the Ministry of Tourism. The airports handled 51,729 international tourists in the January-July period versus

  • School reopening ‘offers model for other sectors’

    World Health Organisation (WHO) representative to Cambodia Li Ailan said school reopening process should be used as a role model for reopening other sectors currently mothballed by the Covid-19 pandemic. Li strongly supports the government’s decision to reopen schools, saying it is a decision

  • Covid jab drive for 6-11 age group to begin Sept 17

    Prime Minister Hun Sen has permitted Covid-19 vaccinations for over 1.8 million children aged 6-11 across the country from September 17 in order for them to return to school after a long hiatus. Hun Sen also hinted that vaccinations for the 3-6 age group will follow in