Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Bank job's small return

Bank job's small return

Bank job's small return

B EING one of the country's top professional women doesn't necessarily mean that one will be laughing all the way to the bank.

At least, National Bank of Cambodia's Deputy Governor Tioulong Saumura doesn't seem to think so.

She says her job is 24 hour-a-day, 100 percent involvement with little opportunity for leisure.

Sam Rainsy's wife spoke frankly about her work in an interview with the Post.

She said: "I can't really say how many hours I spend working at the bank. It's an ongoing job and since I never switch off my mobile phone I'm always busy.

"Sometimes I wish I were more like my husband. Once he decides that enough is enough and that he wants to relax then he completely shuts out all outside interference.

"He relaxes by playing with his organ or reading Thai novels. I can't do that. Maybe it has something to do with the fact that I'm a woman.

"I only get about three to four hours sleep a night. I am terribly conscientious about my work and my children are also a priority.

Saumura said: "As deputy governor of the National Bank of Cambodia, I earn a monthly salary of 100,000 riels. That's about $40.

"Of course, I can't live on that and I don't actually take the money. I share it between my two secretaries who work long hours and are unable to take on a second job to supplement their income. My husband does the same thing with his salary.

"We are both living off our savings. When I lived in France, I worked for Indosuez Bank and used to be a director of Fleming [an investment bank].

"Any money I made was invested in real estate and I am also living off dividends on shares I own. I shall probably have to sell a small apartment in France to help with living expenses."

Though Saumura is more comfortably off than most Cambodians she is acutely aware of the ethical problems lowly-paid public servants encounter.

"If you were earning $20 a month and had five children and a wife to feed, what would you do? How does one escape the vicious circle? It's hard to do," she said.

"The best way to fight corruption is through economic growth.

"That way people will come to realize that it is not necessary to be corrupt. Cambodians have not lost all sense of moral values. It comes and goes, it's cyclical. Now everything rests on private investment."

MOST VIEWED

  • NY sisters inspired by Khmer heritage

    Growing up in Brooklyn, New York, Cambodian-American sisters Edo and Eyen Chorm have always felt a deep affinity for their Cambodian heritage and roots. When the pair launched their own EdoEyen namesake jewellery brand in June, 2020, they leaned heavily into designs inspired by ancient Khmer

  • Schools drawn into Manet degree row

    Prime Minister Hun Sen stepped into the Hun Manet-Sam Rainsy war of words over the validity of Manet’s degree from the US Military Academy at West Point, set off by Rainsy’s claims that Manet had received a “second-class degree” or “honorary degree”. Hun

  • Cambodia records first Omicron community case

    The Ministry of Health on January 9 reported 30 new Covid-19 cases, 29 of which were imported and all were confirmed to be the Omicron variant. The ministry also reported 11 recoveries and no new deaths. Earlier on January 9, the ministry also announced that it had detected the Kingdom's

  • The effects of the USD interest rate hike on Cambodian economy

    Experts weigh in on the effect of a potential interest rate expansion by the US Federal Reserve on a highly dollarised Cambodia Anticipation of the US Federal Reserve’s interest rate hike in March is putting developing economies on edge, a recent blog post by

  • PM eyes Myanmar peace troika

    Prime Minister Hun Sen has suggested that ASEAN member states establish a tripartite committee or diplomatic troika consisting of representatives from Cambodia, Brunei and Indonesia that would be tasked with mediating a ceasefire in Myanmar. The premier also requested that Nippon Foundation chairman Yohei Sasakawa

  • Kampot tourism quay ‘90% done’

    Construction on Kampot International Tourism Port – a 4ha quay in Teuk Chhou district about 6km west of Kampot town – has fallen off track, reaching 90 per cent completion, according to a senior Ministry of Tourism official last week. The project is now planned to be finished