Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Big brands talk labour rights

Big brands talk labour rights

Big brands talk labour rights

110906_3
Pairs of unfinished Puma shoes sit on Huey Chen’s assembly line in July, when the factory was forced to stop work for several days after a mass fainting episode.

The biggest names in the apparel industry, including Nike, Puma and Gap, would meet today with officials from the Ministry of Labour to discuss issues plaguing the Cambodian garment manufacturing industry, such as mass fainting and contractual disputes, labour activists said yesterday.

Dave Welsh, country director for the American Centre for International Labour Solidarity, said unions, the International Labour Organisation, buyers and rights groups would discuss serious issues such as occupational health and safety, nutrition and exploitative contracts.

“Every major garment brand in the world that you can imagine is going to be here,” Welsh said.

Unions had been preparing all week and would push hard against the practice whereby factories repeatedly placed garment workers on fixed- duration contracts, even if they had been long-term employees, he said.

“Fixed-duration contracts basically mean you’re an apprentice. You can work for six or seven months, and that’s fine, except you can end up doing it for eight years.”

At a separate meeting that was closed to the press yesterday, footwear companies gathered with key stakeholders to discuss similar issues within Cambodia’s shoe manufacturing factories.

Outbreaks of mass fainting have been repeatedly reported in Cambodian garment and shoe factories this year drawing criticism from rights groups and in one case, an independent investigation commissioned by Puma into one of its suppliers.

Helen Ford, a representative of Pentland group, which licenses Speedo and other brands, said on the sidelines of yesterday’s meeting that her organisation took occupational health and safety issues in Cambodia very seriously.

“I think collaboration in a forum to improve factory conditions for workers is extremely important. It’s a very difficult area to collaborate in because of the many parties that are involved, so an initiative like Better Factories Cambodia is ground-breaking,” she said.

Exploratory-level talks had been held into the possibility of setting up a regulatory representative body for shoe manufacturing companies in the Kingdom performing a similar role as the Garment Manufacturer’s Association in Cambodia.

Officials at the Ministry of Labour could not be reached for comment yesterday.

MOST VIEWED

  • Kingdom may hire Turkish power ship

    Cambodia is considering negotiating with Turkey to hire a 200MW-capacity power ship to meet electricity demands as the country faces an ongoing electrical shortage, according to the prime minister. Speaking to garment workers in Pursat province on Wednesday, Prime Minister Hun Sen said Electricite du

  • ‘Kingdom lacks up to 400MW in available electricity’

    Prime Minister Hun Sen has called on the general public, hoteliers and businesspeople with generators to use them as back-up as the Electricity Authority of Cambodia cannot generate enough electricity to meet needs due to low water levels in power station reservoirs. On Saturday evening

  • EDC tackles power shortfall

    Electrcite Du Cambodge (EDC) on Monday issued a statement updating the public on its efforts to tackle insufficient electricity supplies during the ongoing dry season. Reductions in electricity prices have resulted in a steady increase in consumers in the Kingdom, while local and international investors

  • African swine fever spreads to VN-Cambodia border

    African swine fever has spread to parts of Vietnam that border Cambodia’s Ratanakkiri and Kratie provinces, a Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries official said on Friday. Tan Phannara, the General Directorate of Animal Health and Production director-general, told a Phnom Penh workshop that