Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - British hostage put staff ahead of himself



British hostage put staff ahead of himself

British hostage put staff ahead of himself

BRITISH demining specialist Chris Howes - at press time on April 2 in his seventh

day as a hostage to armed men, at an unknown location - was "brave" in

refusing a conditional offer of freedom, says his boss, Mines Advisory Group (MAG)

country director Archie McCarron.

Howes, 36, from Bristol in England, was kidnapped on March 26 around 9am with 26

Cambodian deminers in a village north of Siem Reap.

Howes was told later that same day he could leave to bring back an as-yet unknown

ransom, in exchange for ten Khmer deminers the kidnappers would have kept. This was

dependant on local police and militia not becoming involved.

"Chris could not obviously ensure the continued welfare of his team had he left,"

McCarron said.

"He made a decision for the welfare of his team that he should stay."

While Howes, 36, and his interpreter Houn Hoerth stayed, the rest of the deminers,

by 2pm on the first day, had been freed unharmed.

McCarron, acknowledging Howes was "brave", also said: "MAG specialists

are responsible for the safety of the team members and their welfare.

"They build up a rapport with the team, and a sense of camaraderie where each

member supports the other. Specialists are an integral part of this ethos,"

McCarron said.

Howes, who came to Cambodia in November last year, has worked for some years at MAG

- his mission before Cambodia was in Kurdistan - and before that as an engineer in

the British Army.

His father was quoted on BBC television saying that Howes was trained for such circumstances,

and would cope well.

McCarron said Howes was a "boisterous character socially," but "workwise

was stable, experienced and a fairly cool character."

Howes and Hoerth appear to have fallen into the hands of a group that were Khmer

Rouge, who defected to the Government and later sent to Poipet to fight. They promptly

deserted the battlefield, commandeered an armored personnel carrier, and drove back

to Siem Reap - on the way back involved in a tense stand-off with RCAF regulars who

decided it was more prudent to let them pass.

There has not been any independently confirmed sighting or contact from the group

since March 26. "We're in the unfortunate and unhappy position of receiving

speculative reports of where Chris and Hoerth may be," McCarron said. Differing

stories about their location have come from various official and unofficial channels.

Siem Reap authorities are leading attempts to arrange the hostages' release. The

shady nature of the group - whose contacts with the Khmer Rouge are said to be stronger

than those with the Government - is probably making provincial governor Toan Chay's

job so much harder. McCarron said local authorities view the group as "bandits

whose allegiances seem to sway."

When asked whether authorities had made their best efforts to break the deadlock,

McCarron said: "We have to assume so, and there's reason for any perceived shortfall."

MAG and provincial authorities are trying to establish a "mechanism" to

work together to validate the various accounts of the hostages' location and condition.

"Unfortunately we're in an early stage to establish this," McCarron said.

Howes - whose team were demining a tertiary road, under subcontract to the German

NGO KFW, on behalf of a World Food Program project - had made it known to all competent

authorities that MAG was working in the area, McCarron said. "It's true that

it was a new location for us," he said, "but it was known to all those

who needed to know."

MAG does not have armed guards as security, McCarron said. As a non-political, non-sectarian

organization, it relied on being part of the mainly UN security network, being briefed,

receiving reports and liasing with local police and militia about security matters.

"All this had been done by Chris, including the previous night and on that morning

of their departure to the site," McCarron said.

McCarron said witnesses' reports were still being re-checked and verified. However,

he related the following chain of events.

The demining team had arrived at the site around 7:50am, a bit late because one of

their two trucks had mechanical problems.

Before 9am they had checked their equipment and begun work. Some of the deminers

said they saw three or four armed men around the parked trucks, but thought they

were local militia and paid them no attention.

One deminer then saw the men level their guns at Howes and Heorth, and immediately

a larger group of men - with guns levelled - approached from the north, following

livestock paths across the mine field.

An unknown number of deminers ran off - later to be reported doing so on a UN radio

network, which was the first MAG in Phnom Penh heard of the trouble- while the rest

were told to stay put "or they would be fired upon."

Howes and Hoerth were put in the back of the MAG Toyota pick-up, while the other

deminers climbed into the back of the hired truck.

They were driven north about four kms till the road stopped. At this point, Howes

was given the option to return and get money, and told that if local militia approached

"we will kill the deminers." Howes refused.

The men were all then marched off into a heavily wooded forest; several managed to

escape at this point, but how many is unknown.

Around 2pm, the kidnappers decided to release all the Khmer deminers, keeping Howes

and Hoerth, reminding the released men "that any approach by local militia or

police may result in them killing Chris and Hoerth," McCarron said.

MOST VIEWED

  • Phnom Penh placed in two-week lockdown

    The government has decided to place Phnom Penh in lockdown for two weeks, effective April 14 midnight through April 28, as Cambodia continues to grapple with the ongoing community outbreak of Covid-19, which has seen no sign of subsiding. According to a directive signed by Prime Minister

  • Cambodia on the verge of national tragedy, WHO warns

    The World Health Organisation (WHO) in Cambodia warned that the country had reached another critical point amid a sudden, huge surge in community transmission cases and deaths. “We stand on the brink of a national tragedy because of Covid-19. Despite our best efforts, we are

  • Vaccination open to foreigners in Cambodia

    The Ministry of Health on April 8 issued an announcement on Covid-19 vaccination for foreigners residing and working in Cambodia, directing the Ministry of Labour and Vocational Training and local authorities to register them. Health minister Mam Bun Heng, who is also head of the inter-ministerial

  • Hun Sen: Stay where you are, or else

    Prime Minister Hun Sen warned that the two-week lockdown of Phnom Penh and adjacent Kandal provincial town Takmao could be extended if people are not cooperative by staying home. “Now let me make this clear: stay in your home, village, and district and remain where

  • Culture ministry: Take Tuol Sleng photos down, or else

    The Ministry of Culture and Fine Arts has told Irish photographer Matt Loughrey to take down the photos of Khmer Rouge victims at Tuol Sleng Genocidal Museum which he allegedly colourised and altered to show them smiling. The ministry said Loughrey's work is unacceptable, affecting

  • Cambodia gears up for muted New Year festival

    The recent curfew and restrictions imposed in the capital and other Covid-19 hotspots were intended to break the chain of transmission, Ministry of Health spokeswoman Or Vandine said as municipal and provincial authorities issued new directives banning certain activities during the upcoming Khmer New Year