Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Buddhist orders offer politicians road to peace

Buddhist orders offer politicians road to peace

Buddhist orders offer politicians road to peace

PATRIARCHS of Cambodia's two rival Buddhist sects, who have squabbled in the past,

met last week in a show of reconciliation. Many hoped that the encounter could serve

as a model for Khmer leaders to end their disputes for the sake of peace.

"[Politicians] should take note of this meeting. This Buddhist meeting is a

good symbol for all leaders and people in all levels to follow," said Samdech

Preah Reap Tep Vong, the head of the Mohanikay sect, said.

Sitting around a flower-strewn sign reading "May Peace Prevail on Earth",

Tep Vong and Samdech Preah Anoch Bou Kri, head of the Thammayut sect, met on March

3 in Phnom Penh's Svay Popei pagoda to pray together for peace.

The Venerable Ing Kieth, who took a weeklong respite from his jobs as Deputy Prime

Minister and Minister of Public Works to join the monkhood, arranged the symbolic

meeting.

"I had invited the two Samdech partriarchs - Mohanika-ay and Thammayut - to

attend [the ceremony]. This is a good sign to show that ... all the monks are as

one," he said, adding that it was also a good opportunity for him to help push

Cambodia towards peace.

Kieth is loyal to ousted premier Prince Norodom Ranariddh and temporarily fled the

country in fear of his life after last July's coup. His uniformed bodyguards accompanied

him throughout his stay in the pagoda.

"Today, I am not only doing good for the Buddhist religion, but I have also

organized the prayer ceremony in order to bring peace for the younger generation

[throughout the nation]," he said.

Tep Vong said that "too much killing" has been occurring recently. He expressed

regret that Cambodia's reputation as a Buddhist country will be harmed as a result.

Yet the monks themselves may not always have been models of tolerance and compassion.

Although the two patriarchs denied any past dispute between the sects, observers

say privately that the conciliatory tone of the prayer ceremony followed years of

subtle friction between the two sects.

"Samdech Preah Anoch and I have good solidarity and we have made a good friendship,"

Tep Vong said. He declined to talk about past bickering between the sects, using

a Khmer proverb: "I don't want to twist off the ants' bottom to make them attack

each other."

But the sects have long-running differences. After the ouster of the anti-religion

Khmer Rouge, Mohanikay was the only Buddhism practiced under the State of Cambodia

regime; Thammayut did not reappear until the King's return in 1991.

Phnom Penh's Wat Botum was originally a Thammayut pagoda, but was taken over by the

Mohanikay during the SOC. In the 90's the resurgent Thammayut asked for their pagoda

back, but the Mohanikay only agreed to split the pagoda half and half, according

to Khmer Buddhist Society director Ou Bun Long. The split continues today.

Thammayut's perceived close association with the Royals - the sect was established

by a Royal family member - and Mohanikay's ascendance during the SOC period has led

some observers to refer to "Funcinpec monks" and "CPP monks".

Differences between the two orders include their methods of prayer and handling of

money, according to Bun Long.

The Mohanikay use a prayer language very similar to Khmer, while the Thammayut use

a more difficult language akin to Sanskrit. And the former sect can use money, while

the latter employs accountants as they cannot touch money, according to Bun Long.

The robes and rice bowls also differ: Mohanikay robes are all one piece, and monks

may hang the rice bowls from their shoulders or hold them. Thammayut robes are of

several pieces and sewn with a different stitch, and monks may only hold their bowls

on the bottom.

But despite their differences, the patriarchs said they are ready to start a new

era of friendship both for their followers and the whole country.

Tep Vong said at the ceremony that peace will not come to Cambodia by just paying

lip service to the word, but that people must follow Buddhist principles, especially

the Five Precepts and the Eightfold Path.

The Five Buddhist Precepts are: don't kill, don't steal, don't drink alcohol, don't

lie and don't commit unchaste acts. The Eightfold Path is: right view; right resolve;

right speech; right action; right livelihood (including not selling arms); right

effort; right mindfulness; right concentration.

Tep Vong said: "If every person at every level can implement at least one of

the Buddhist precepts each, then peace will definitely be reached."

MOST VIEWED

  • Prince Norodom Ranariddh passes away at 77

    Prince Norodom Ranariddh, the second son of the late King Father Norodom Sihanouk and former First Prime Minister of Cambodia, has passed away in France at the age of 77. “Samdech Krom Preah Norodom Ranariddh has passed away this morning in France just after 9am Paris-time,”

  • Rise in planned flights lifts travel hopes

    Six airlines have applied to resume flights in December, while two others have put in for additional flights and routes, according to State Secretariat of Civil Aviation (SSCA) head Mao Havannall on November 29. These account for 43 new weekly domestic and international flights in December, up 16

  • General’s gun smuggling ring busted

    The Military Police sent six military officers to court on November 22 to face prosecution for possession of 105 illegal rifles and arms smuggling, while investigators say they are still hunting down additional accomplices. Sao Sokha, deputy commander of the Royal Cambodian Armed Forces and commander of

  • Cambodia, Thailand to discuss border reopening

    Cambodian authorities from provinces along the Cambodia-Thailand border will meet with Thai counterparts to discuss reopening border checkpoints to facilitate travel, transfer of products and cross-border trade between the two countries. Banteay Meanchey provincial deputy governor Ly Sary said on November 22 that the provincial administration

  • Hun Sen: Manet to be candidate for prime minister

    Prime Minister Hun Sen has reaffirmed that his oldest son Hun Manet will be his successor as Prime Minister if he is elected. Speaking during the inauguration of a new sewage treatment facility in Preah Sihanouk province on December 2, Hun Sen said Manet will be

  • More Cambodians studying in US

    The number of Cambodian students studying at US colleges and universities in 2020-21 increased by 14.3 per cent over the previous year despite the Covid-19 pandemic, according to a recent US government report. The 2021 Open Doors report on International Educational Exchange showed that 848 Cambodian students studied