Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Cambodia on Failed State Index

Cambodia on Failed State Index

Cambodia on Failed State Index

The American magazine Foreign Policy and the Washington, DC-based Fund for Peace

released their second-annual Failed States Index on May 2, which, for the first time,

included a ranking for Cambodia.

The Kingdom was tied with the Dominican Republic for 47th place on the Index, a ranking

which measures the risk of violent conflict or other potential forms of state collapse,

rather than actual failure. Countries ranked from 41 to 60 are considered "borderline".

The top 60 countries on the list of 148 states surveyed are considered the most vulnerable,

with Sudan ranked first, followed by the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ivory

Coast, Iraq, Zimbabwe, and Chad.

Cambodia is considered better off than many of its Asian neighbors, including Pakistan

(9), Afghanistan (10), North Korea (14), Burma (18), Bangladesh (19), Nepal (20),

Sri Lanka (25), Kirgizstan (28) Indonesia (32), Bhutan (39), Laos (39), Tajikistan

(42), and Turkmenistan (45).

According to Foreign Policy, the Index "provides snapshots of state vulnerability

or risk of violence during a window of time." Software is used to scan tens

of thousands of "open-source articles". Data is also drawn from public

documents, US State Department reports, independent studies and corporate financial

reports.

The time frame for this year's survey was May to December 2005, so in Cambodia's

case it would not include the January release of political activists, the so-called

reconciliation between the CPP and the Sam Rainsy Party and Prime Minister Hun Sen's

about-face on the defamation law.

For more information visit:
www.ForeignPolicy.com
www.fundforpeace.org

MOST VIEWED

  • Government hits back at threats to pull EBA, suspend UN seat

    The spokesman for the ruling Cambodian People’s Party (CPP) has said the government is in no way concerned after the European Parliament gave it three months to reverse what it called the “systematic repression of the political opposition”. Ignoring the ultimatum could mean facing

  • Chinese influx pushing locals, Westerners out of Preah Sihanouk

    Some within the Kingdom’s tourism industry have speculated that the recent influx of Chinese visitors may hinder domestic tourism as the price of accommodations in the coastal city of Sihanoukville continues to rise. Preah Sihanouk province, which has become a hotbed for Chinese investment

  • Sar Kheng: Sokha requested security

    Interior Minister Sar Kheng on Sunday revealed the story behind the transfer of former opposition party leader Kem Sokha from Trapaing Phlong prison in Tbong Khmum province to his house in the capital. Speaking at the ruling Cambodian People’s Party (CPP) headquarters in Prey

  • ‘Dire consequences’ from sanctions, warns AmCham

    American businesspeople in Cambodia have warned that any sanction against the Kingdom would have “dire consequences” that could push Cambodia even further into the arms of China. In a letter to US senators and representatives dated Monday, the American Chamber of Commerce Cambodia (AmCham) said