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Cambodia shows its style in Germany

Cambodia shows its style in Germany

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CAMBODIA'S cultural heritage is on view to millions of visitors to the 2000 Expo

currently being staged in Hanover, Germany.

The entrance to the Cambodian pavilion at Expo 2000 in Hanover, Germany

A grant of DM950,000 (US$450,000) from the German government has enabled Cambodia

to construct a pavilion in the style of traditional Khmer architecture and adorned

with replicas of carvings and bas reliefs from the Angkorean era.

The five-month exposition, taking up 100 hectares at the Hanover trade fair grounds

is expected to attract 40 million visitors.

More than 170 countries are participating, setting up pavilions highlighting their

cultural and natural attractions.

The Cambodian pavilion covers 300 square meters and features examples of Khmer traditional

arts, photographs and displays of the temples of Angkor and ancient Khmer houses

along the Mekong River.

There is also a small commercial section selling Cambodian silks, decorations and

books.

A representative from the Cambodian Ministry of Commerce said the pavilion was something

all Cambodians could be proud of.

He said Germany had been very welcoming to Cambodia and had provided much assistance

in the construction of the pavilion.

In contrast to Cambodia's modest representation, one of the most spectacular of the

pavilions is that of the host country. It is a huge glass and steel structure containing

47 busts of German innovators and pioneers.

The German exhibition also has a continuous series of movies projected on to the

walls of their pavilion highlighting Germany's past and desires for the future.

Australia's pavilion is another impressive spectacle. It is constructed from a translucent

material which at night glows with the interior lighting while during the day offers

a tantalizing preview of what is inside. The center piece is an 18 meter long recreation

of the Great Barrier Reef in a glass tank at the pavilion's entrance.

Canada invites you to visit their pavilion with a 9-meter-tall maple leaf, intended

to draw attention to Canada's dynamic pavilion facade. Inside there is a virtual

river in which the colors of Canada's natural world are reflected as the seasons

change.

A show in a 360-degree cinema, which appeals to various senses, depicts Canada's

path to a modern industrial nation characterized by fascinating landscapes and people

of different ethnic origins.

France's pavilion is also exciting.

The pavilion, a structure of glass and wood ,was designed by the French architect

Francoise-Helene Jourda. When one enters, the pavilion turns out to be a transparent

casing in which a section of forest can be seen.

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