Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - China to try Uighur deportees




China to try Uighur deportees

China to try Uighur deportees

CHINA has indicated that the 20 ethnic Uighur asylum seekers who were forcibly deported by Cambodian authorities in December are set to stand trial for committing “criminal” acts, American media have quoted a Chinese official as saying.

Ma Zhaoxu, a Foreign Ministry spokesman, said in a written statement to The New York Times last week that China was a country “ruled by law” and was set to implement it in the case of the Uighurs.

“The judicial authorities deal with illegal criminal issues strictly according to law,” he said in a written statement to the paper. Like previous Chinese statements, the Times report did not include any information about the nature of the charges against the Uighurs or when they are to stand trial.

The vague announcement has done little to dampen increasing concern about the fate of the 20 Uighurs – including three children – who were flown out of Cambodia on December 19 after arriving in Cambodia a month earlier to seek political asylum.

Uighur rights groups say a total of 22 Uighurs arrived in Cambodia in November after witnessing ethnic riots in China’s Xinjiang province in July.

Many observers linked the deportations to the arrival in Cambodia the following day of Vice President Xi Jinping, who signed an unprecedented US$1.2 billion in economic aid agreements with Cambodia. Two Uighurs escaped at the time and still remain unaccounted for.

In a statement issued on January 28, Human Rights Watch alleged that the deportees had disappeared into a “black hole” on their return to China.

“There is no information about their whereabouts, no notification of any legal charges against them, and there are no guarantees they are safe from torture and ill-treatment,” Sophie Richardson, the group’s Asia advocacy director, said in the statement.

The group also called on the Chinese government to “disclose the status and whereabouts” of the 20 Uighurs and allow them to meet with family members, lawyers and UN officials.

Sister Denise Coughlan, director of Jesuit Refugee Services Cambodia, which was involved with the Uighur case, said that in her interactions with the 22 asylum seekers, she had no impression that they were responsible for criminal acts.

“My experience of them is that they committed no crime other than trying to escape a country they feared was going to torture them,” she said.

She also said that the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees, which had previously put its trust in the Cambodian government to properly process the Uighurs’ asylum claims, should be allowed to meet with them in China.

“Because they were taken from a house that was guaranteed safe by UNHCR and the Cambodian government, the UN should be allowed access to them,” she added.

When contacted on Sunday, Ministry of Interior spokesman Khieu Sopheak said he did not know what was happening in China with regard to the Uighurs.

“We have done our job already, which is to implement the law in Cambodia,” he said. He added that authorities were still trying to locate the two remaining Uighurs, but that so far he had heard no information about them.

On January 26, a court in Urumqi, Xinjiang’s capital, handed down death sentences for four more Uighurs who were accused of involvement in the July riots, bringing to 26 the number of those sentenced to death in connection with the incidents.

MOST VIEWED

  • WHO: antibiotics cause more deaths

    Increased antibiotics use in combating the Covid-19 pandemic will strengthen bacterial resistance and ultimately lead to more deaths during the crisis and beyond, the World Health Organisation (WHO) said on Monday. WHO director-general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said a “worrying number” of bacterial infections were becoming

  • Children in poverty said to rise by 86M

    The UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and Save the Children warned that if urgent measures are not taken, the number of children living in poverty across low- and middle-income countries could increase by 86 million, a 15 per cent jump, by the end of the year. In

  • PM slams HRW ‘double standards’

    Prime Minister Hun Sen has chided Human Rights Watch (HRW) Asia director Brad Adams for keeping quiet over protest crackdowns in the US following the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis on May 25. Addressing reporters while inspecting infrastructure development in Preah Sihanouk province on Monday,

  • Four more UN troops infected by Covid virus

    Four more Cambodian Blue Helmet peacekeepers in Mali have been diagnosed with the novel coronavirus, bringing the number of infected Cambodian UN peacekeepers to 10. National Centre for Peacekeeping Forces and Explosive Remnants of War deputy director-general and spokeswoman Kosal Malinda told The Post on Tuesday

  • Huge tracks of undocumented land a concern for registration officials

    Siem Reap provincial deputy governor Ly Samrith expressed concern that land registration plans for residents scheduled to be completed by late 2021 could not be achieved because 80 per cent of the land had not been registered. Land dispute issues are a major factor that poses a

  • Bank robber of $6M asks to be released

    An accused bank robber who admitted to stealing $6 million has asked the Supreme Court to release him temporarily because he had returned the money. In a court hearing on Tuesday Chan Simuntha, 39, told the judge that on January 18, his wife Teang Vathanaknearyroth told him that