Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Closing Cambo Six is a safe bet for securing government's social goals



Closing Cambo Six is a safe bet for securing government's social goals

Closing Cambo Six is a safe bet for securing government's social goals

Dear Editor,

The Phnom Penh Post's article "Game over for Cambo Six", published on February 26 about the government's closure of Cambodia's legal betting company Cambo Six  revealed another major development of the Kingdom's policies towards gambling. It is more focused on long-term results of social improvement by eliminating contradictory forces such as gambling. The new policy will save a great deal for the government's poverty reduction plan, for public spending and for improvements in education.

Firstly, the closure will remove the forces that contradict poverty-reduction efforts. This means at the same time the government and civil society are running programs to make people richer, gambling makes them poorer.  

Secondly, the government's order saves the country's public spending. The government, of course, loses tax income from gambling. But they do not need to increase the budget to cope with social problems resulting from gambling. Domestic violence, robbery and rising school dropout rates are among the main consequences, which the state needs to spend a lot of money and time to recover.  

Finally, the termination of the betting business will indirectly help improve the quality of education among young people. Some of Cambo Six's customers, for instance, are youths who are still studying at schools. They may become involved in betting with sporting motivations, but they usually end up with betting addictions. For that reason, making it difficult for them to bet by closing betting places is a good start to bringing them back to schools.

Some might argue that the closure of legal gambling companies will harm the country's investment environment and create more unemployment. However, any investments that benefit a few but hurt the rest are not what the country needs.  

Meas Bunly

Amsterdam

Send letters to: [email protected] or P.O.鈥圔ox 146, Phnom Penh, Cambodia. The Post reserves the right to edit letters to a shorter length.

MOST VIEWED

  • ‘Kingdom one of safest to visit in Covid-19 era’

    The Ministry of Tourism on January 12 proclaimed Cambodia as one of the safest countries to visit in light of the Kingdom having been ranked number one in the world by the Senegalese Economic Prospective Bureau for its success in handling the Covid-19 pandemic. In rankings

  • Kingdom accepts Chinese vaccine, PM first to get jab

    Prime Minister Hun Sen said China would offer Cambodia an immediate donation of one million doses of the Covid-19 vaccine produced by the Sinopharm company. In an audio message addressing the public on the night of January 15, he said Cambodia has accepted the offer and

  • Reeling in Cambodia’s real estate sector

    A new norm sets the scene but risks continue to play out in the background A cold wind sweeps through the streets of Boeung Trabek on an early January morning as buyers and traders engage in commerce under bright blue skies. From a distance, the

  • Hun Sen: Lakes filled in for national developments

    Prime Minister Hun Sen has announced continued operations to fill some lakes in Phnom Penh to create land for developments, though he is against the unrelated practice of damming rivers or blocking waterways. Speaking at the inauguration of the Ministry of Public Works and Transport

  • Koh Preus upgrades 70% complete

    Initial construction of a nearly $30 million tourism infrastructure project on Preah Sihanouk province’s Koh Preus Island is “about 70 per cent complete”, according to an official with the developer. Heng Thou, construction site manager of Angela Real Estate Co Ltd (ARE), told The Post that

  • Local media loses a giant, and The Post a great friend

    Cheang Sokha, a gifted and streetwise reporter who rose to the highest ranks of Cambodian media and was beloved for his sharp intelligence, world-class humour and endless generosity, died on Friday in his hometown of Phnom Penh. He was 42. His wife, Sok Sophorn, said he