Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Corruption not rampant: Hun Many

Corruption not rampant: Hun Many

Hun Many
Prime Minister Hun Sen’s youngest son, Hun Many (centre), travels through the streets of Phnom Penh campaigning in the lead-up to the national election last year. Sreng Meng Srun

Corruption not rampant: Hun Many

Hun Many, the youngest son of Prime Minister Hun Sen and an elected lawmaker in Kampong Speu province, has defended his party against allegations of nepotism, corruption and election irregularities in a foreign TV interview.

In a wide-ranging Channel News Asia interview that aired on Friday, Many, 32, the youngest member of the National Assembly, painted himself as part of a new generation of Cambodian People’s Party leaders coming through the ranks.

Throughout the interview, Many emphasised that he wished to prove himself as an able politician that could get things done, though he struggled to outline specific policy areas where he had goals.

He also countered charges of nepotism by saying that political positions needed to be looked at not as a “status” but as a “responsibility we need to bear and we need to fulfil”.

“It’s not my father who wants me to be a National Assembly member and then [I] get the position,” he said.

But Many did suggest he would take inspiration from his father in political life.

“I am a politician in the making I have to admit it. But I think the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree, and in that regard, I want to specify [and] clarify, not because of how people judge my father as a strongman, but the foundation that working with him as his personal secretary, as his son, and [his] judgment that I have seen.”

The lawmaker also said he was “not yet” thinking about whether he wanted to be prime minister.

On the idea that his father was grooming him for a top position in politics, he demurred, saying the public would judge him on merit.

“A father always [wishes] well for the children but again, after that, it is no longer about his decision.”

Many also said that corruption should not be described as “rampant” – to which the interviewer retorted that Transparency International would disagree with him.

“I’m saying, yes, there [is] corruption but not at the level where this country is still not attractive for investment,” Many said.

MOST VIEWED

  • Negotiations on EBA being held

    In an effort to defuse tensions, a senior government official said Cambodia is negotiating with the European Union (EU) on the Everything But Arms (EBA) trade deal, which allows the Kingdom to export goods to the 28-member bloc tariff-free. The EU notified Cambodia on October 5

  • Ministers to tackle sea pollutants

    Preah Sihanouk provincial authorities and members of local communities have collected 77 tonnes of water hyacinth at a Sihanoukville beach, Preah Sihanouk Provincial Hall spokesperson Or Saroeun said. He told The Post yesterday that the aquatic weeds had been floating along some of the province’s

  • Chinese police escort deported scam suspects

    Ninety-one Chinese nationals accused of extorting money from victims in a Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) scam were deported from Phnom Penh International Airport on Monday under the escort of 182 Chinese police personnel. General Department of Immigration head of investigations Ouk Hay Seila told reporters

  • Sam Rainsy, government group set to clash at IPU Geneva meet?

    Opposition figure Sam Rainsy has been invited to speak at the General Assembly of the Inter-Parliamentary Union (IPU) in Geneva, according to a former Cambodia National Rescue Party (CNRP) lawmaker. A government delegation is also set to attend the meeting, a National Assembly press release