Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Corruption not rampant: Hun Many

Corruption not rampant: Hun Many

Hun Many
Prime Minister Hun Sen’s youngest son, Hun Many (centre), travels through the streets of Phnom Penh campaigning in the lead-up to the national election last year. Sreng Meng Srun

Corruption not rampant: Hun Many

Hun Many, the youngest son of Prime Minister Hun Sen and an elected lawmaker in Kampong Speu province, has defended his party against allegations of nepotism, corruption and election irregularities in a foreign TV interview.

In a wide-ranging Channel News Asia interview that aired on Friday, Many, 32, the youngest member of the National Assembly, painted himself as part of a new generation of Cambodian People’s Party leaders coming through the ranks.

Throughout the interview, Many emphasised that he wished to prove himself as an able politician that could get things done, though he struggled to outline specific policy areas where he had goals.

He also countered charges of nepotism by saying that political positions needed to be looked at not as a “status” but as a “responsibility we need to bear and we need to fulfil”.

“It’s not my father who wants me to be a National Assembly member and then [I] get the position,” he said.

But Many did suggest he would take inspiration from his father in political life.

“I am a politician in the making I have to admit it. But I think the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree, and in that regard, I want to specify [and] clarify, not because of how people judge my father as a strongman, but the foundation that working with him as his personal secretary, as his son, and [his] judgment that I have seen.”

The lawmaker also said he was “not yet” thinking about whether he wanted to be prime minister.

On the idea that his father was grooming him for a top position in politics, he demurred, saying the public would judge him on merit.

“A father always [wishes] well for the children but again, after that, it is no longer about his decision.”

Many also said that corruption should not be described as “rampant” – to which the interviewer retorted that Transparency International would disagree with him.

“I’m saying, yes, there [is] corruption but not at the level where this country is still not attractive for investment,” Many said.

MOST VIEWED

  • New US bill ‘is a violation of Cambodian independence’

    After a US congressmen introduced bipartisan legislation that will enact sanctions on Cambodian officials responsible for “undermining democracy” in the Kingdom, government officials and the ruling Cambodian People’s Party on Sunday said they regarded the potential action as the “violation of independence and sovereignty

  • Angkor Wat named as the top landmark for the second year

    Travel website TripAdvisor has named Cambodia’s ancient wonder Angkor Wat as the top landmark in the world for the second year running in their Travelers’ Choice Award 2018, an achievement Cambodian tourism operators expect will attract more tourists to the Kingdom. The website uses traveller

  • Ministry’s plan for net sparks fears

    The government has ordered all domestic and international internet traffic in the Kingdom to pass through a Data Management Centre (DMC) that has been newly created by the state-owned Telecom Cambodia, in a move some have claimed is an attempt to censor government critics. Spokesman

  • Hun Sen detractors ‘will die’

    Prime Minister Hun Sen on Wednesday said those who curse or insult him would eventually die without a plot of land to bury their bodies after being killed by lightning, suffering the same fate as those who recently died in Thmar Baing district in Koh