Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Development blamed for floods

Development blamed for floods

Development blamed for floods

4-story-2.jpg
4-story-2.jpg

Residents say the filling in of Phnom Penh’s drainage lakes is putting the city underwater

Photo by: Heng chivoan

A woman pulls a cart with her children past a flooded area.

PHNOM Penh residents and local officials have lashed out at large-scale development companies, saying that the filling in of city overflow ponds and lakes is causing widespread flooding throughout the city.

"I strongly believe that Phnom Penh city will be ruined if construction companies do not stop putting landfill into the [holding ponds] when they develop new buildings," Tin Prasoeur, Phnom Penh's  traffic police chief, said Sunday.

People  living in high development areas such as Russei Keo district, Phnom Penh Thmey, Toektla, Tuol Sanke, Russei Keo, Kilometre No 6, and Chriang Chamres, say that unusual flooding patterns have been triggered by local development sites, with authorities turning a blind eye to complaints.

"My house always floods between October and December, but this year it flooded from the middle of August until now," said Mau Yan, from Kilometre No 6 commune.

In 2005, City Hall prohibited construction companies from filling in overflow ponds and canals for construction, but companies complained.

"We need people and businesses to join together in protecting our city from floods," Phnom Penh Governor Kep Chuktema said at the time, calling on national and international businesses, especially big  players  like CamKo City Co Ltd and Grand Phnom Penh Co Ltd, to support the construction of a new dam in Kobsrov.

But Russey Keo district Governor Kliang Huot told the Post Sunday that the floods did not come from development, but rather from water flowing down from Kampong Speu and Kandal provinces.

New dam in Kobsrov?

Kuoch Tieng Veng, director of the Grand Phnom Penh Co, told the Post Monday that the government had agreed to let the company fill in areas to construct buildings, international schools and golf courses.

He added that "despite being faced with the financial crisis, my company will try to support the project, since they have invested more than US$440 million in the city".

Kuoch Tieng Veng said that City Hall should send the dam project to the national government or seek help from the ADB, World Bank, JICA or IMF,  which could better finance the project than citizens or investors.

Kheng Ser, of CamKo City's project management team, told the Post on Monday that his company will contribute to a dam, but only a small amount.

"We will help City Hall's proposal, but not too much," Kheng Ser said.

MOST VIEWED

  • Phnom Penh’s Jet’s Container Night Market shuts down

    The famous Jet’s Container Night Market in central Phnom Penh has shut down due to the high cost of the land rental, company representatives claim. Jet’s Container Night Market is the largest such market in Phnom Penh. It operated for just over two

  • Hun Sen rejects ‘rift’ rumours spread by ‘stupid gangsters’

    Prime Minister Hun Sen on Wednesday denied a “rift” among top leaders of the Cambodian People’s Party (CPP), and rejected claims that Senate president Say Chhum and Interior Minister Sar Kheng were set to be removed from their positions as rumours spread by “gangsters”.

  • EU ambassador to Cambodia: Rights a ‘work in progress’

    The EU ambassador to Cambodia has called human rights “a work in progress” and said the 28-nation bloc has “carefully” noted last week’s statement by the government on taking further steps to strengthen democracy and the political sphere in the Kingdom. The EU marked

  • Assembly passes amendment to Political Party Law Article 45

    The National Assembly on Thursday unanimously approved a proposed amendment to Article 45 of the Law on Political Parties in a move that could pave the way for former senior opposition leaders banned for five years to return to the political stage. As expected, the 115 ruling