Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Evacuees head to the country - again

Evacuees head to the country - again

Evacuees head to the country - again

IT is not the first time he had to flee his home for political reasons. "The

Lon Nol coup forced me to leave Takeo province for Phnom Penh. Then in 1975 I had

to go back. When the Vietnamese invaded, I had to return to Phnom Penh," said

a long-time resident of war-ravaged Toek Thla on the road to Pochentong.

"Last Sunday, I had to go again. When Funcinpec troops were pushed out and we

saw the CPP bring big artillery onto Pochentong road on Saturday night we started

packing," he recalled. "I took most of my family to Takmao, but decided

it was safe to return Tuesday."

Like thousands of others, he fled the shelling in the capital last weekend, taking

what he could carry. Without a hint of bitterness, he recounted his life with resignation.

"Moving around like this is very difficult," he said. "As you know

as a human being, we want to live in peace and happiness, but it depends on the policies

of the government."

Luckily, he owns his shop house, which was not looted, and had something to come

back to. His brother-in-law volunteered to stay and weather the fighting to keep

the family business intact. He said that about 70% of the residents fled the fierce

fighting and that only one or two men per family stayed in the remaining houses to

protect them from booty-seeking soldiers.

Some did not have so much of a stake in Phnom Penh and decided to keep going. "Many

of the people who have left rented their houses and don't have work now," said

Chan Seang, 53, a construction worker from Taklah. He packed a few clothes and some

food and left his $5 a month house headed east.

"My daughter is a garment-factory [worker] and it was destroyed so we have to

live with relatives in Svay Rieng and help grow rice," he said Tuesday on Rte

1 across the Monivong (Vietnamese) bridge. He told of his neighbors' homes being

looted by CPP soldiers, but said he was spared. "I don't have much to rob. I

am more afraid of the fighting."

Those who fled east during the heat of battle faced the decision of whether to risk

the bridges or pay inflated fares to cross the river. Ferry operators charged between

two and more than ten times the normal price. "There were so many people on

Saturday and Sunday that we had to stop them from coming aboard," said Areksat

dock boat owner Tep Phal. "Usually we leave every 30 minutes, but we left every

ten - the boats filled up very quickly."

She admits that she doubled the price from 500 to 1,000 riels, but added that there

was considerable risk. "We took a big risk to come and go and were very afraid,

but it was an adventure."

Small-boat operators across the Japanese bridge came over to pick up people. "About

30-40 boats from here and the other side ferried back and forth. Some charged up

to 6,000 riels for the crossing [12 times the normal price], but if people had no

money some let them go for free," said a riverside resident. "I have no

idea how many crossed, but most either continued east or have returned."

Of four people from Orphanage No 1 on Street 47 who opted for the Japanese Bridge,

only one made it across. "We were worried about increased fighting between the

Funcinpec headquarters and CPP forces on both sides of us. When we saw Funcinpec

forces ready to fight at 9 am on Sunday, we drove motorcycles towards the Japanese

Bridge 150 meters away," said 25-year old Sok Sorphoan. "On the bridge,

a B40 grenade landed 1.5 meters away and we jumped off the bike."

The lead rider made it across, but the other two motorcycles did not.

Miraculously none of the four were injured and they scattered. Sorphoan hid for 30

minutes waiting for a lull in the fighting and was separated from the group. She

hid in a friend's house nearby. Her friends searched for her over the course of the

day, finally finding her at 5 pm.

Back at the orphanage watching music videos, Sok Seng looked back on the events of

that Sunday. "We were trying to go anywhere away from the shelling," he

recalled. "It was stupid to go. We ended up driving around all day during the

fighting and came back. It would have been safer here."

Seeing a lot of shoes in the road is a good indication that something bad has happened.

Sorphoan's lay on the Japanese Bridge for nearly three days. Then something bizarre

happened. She found them.

MOST VIEWED

  • PM imposes nationwide Covid restrictions, curfew over Delta scare

    Prime Minister Hun Sen late on July 28 instructed the municipal and provincial authorities nationwide to strictly enforce Covid-19 measures including curfew for two weeks from July 29 midnight through August 12 to stem the new coronavirus Delta variant. The instruction came shortly after he issued a directive

  • Two luxury hotels latest quarantine options for inbound travellers

    The Inter-Ministerial Committee to Combat Covid-19 has designated two luxury hotels as alternative quarantine options for travellers who wish to enter Cambodia through Phnom Penh International Airport – Sokha Phnom Penh Hotel & Residence and the Courtyard by Marriott Phnom Penh. In a notice detailing guidelines issued

  • Provinces on Thai borders put in lockdown amid Delta fears

    The government has decided to place several border provinces in lockdown for two weeks in a bid to prevent the new coronavirus Delta variant spreading further into community. According a directive signed by Prime Minister Hun Sen late on July 28, the provinces include Koh Kong,

  • Visa A holders get to quarantine at Himawari Hotel

    The Ministry of Health has permitted foreign diplomats, UN and International NGO officials to undergo quarantine at Himawari Hotel in the capital in case they do not have a separate place suitable for this purpose, but the government would not be responsible for the expenses.

  • Jabs for kids bring hope for school reopenings

    Cambodia is tentatively planning to reopen schools – at least at the secondary level – when the vaccination of children aged 12-17 is completed, even though daily transmissions and deaths in other age groups remain high. Schools across the country have been suspended since March 20, one month

  • China denies Mekong hacking

    As the US and its allies joined hands last week to expose what they allege to be China’s Ministry of State Security’s malicious cyber activities around the world, the attention also turned to Cambodia with the US Department of Justice claiming that four