Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Family seeks compensation

Family seeks compensation

People stand around a hole where fireworks exploded in the capital’s Chroy Changvar district in October, killing one person and injuring seven others
People stand around a hole where fireworks exploded in the capital’s Chroy Changvar district in October, killing one person and injuring seven others. Eli Meixler

Family seeks compensation

The father of a man killed during a government-run fireworks display in October has sent letters to the King and two government institutions demanding compensation for his loss.

Van Na Kry, 51, lost his son, Na Kry Daro, 22, on October 29 when a fireworks canister exploded, sending debris flying into a crowd of onlookers during festivities marking the 10th anniversary of King Norodom Sihamoni’s coronation.

The incident, which authorities called an accident, occurred near the Sokha Hotel, across the water from the Royal Palace.

Na Kry said yesterday that he sent letters last week to the King, the National Assembly and the Ministry of Defence – whose officers had been operating the fireworks display – explaining that the family had been relying on Daro to provide for them well into the future. He also intends to send a letter to Prime Minister Hun Sen’s Cabinet.

“The King and government should pay proper compensation to us since our family’s future depended on him,” he said, adding that his son had studied commerce and English at university. “They sold their property to support his study – but now he has died like this.”

Na Kry said he has yet to receive a response to the letters.

In the days after the tragedy, Phnom Penh Deputy Governor Chreang Sophan said the premier and Governor Pa Socheatvong had donated money to others injured by the fireworks explosion. He added that Daro’s family would also receive some kind of cash payment but did not specify how much or whether it classified as formal compensation.

Officials from the institutions being asked for compensation could not be reached or declined to comment yesterday.

Following the Koh Pich stampede that claimed the lives of 353 people during the annual Water Festival in 2010, the King and the government gave money to injured victims and families of the deceased.

“Normally, the prime minister and his wife always help victims of these kinds of tragedy,” Council of Ministers spokesman Phay Siphan said.

MOST VIEWED

  • Hun Sen’s China visit ‘a good opportunity’

    Prime Minister Hun Sen’s visit to Beijing on Sunday to discuss economic and trade issues presents a good opportunity for the Kingdom to strengthen Chinese ties and counter punitive measures by the West, an analyst says. The prime minister’s four-day official visit to

  • Close to the edge: Hair raising pictures from Kulen Mountain

    A new hair raising attraction on Kulen Mountain has finally opened to the public, with people flocking to the protruding cliff edge overlooking green mountainous forests to take photographs. The giant overhanging rock is situated in an area known as Mahendraparvata – an ancient city of

  • ‘Action needed to stop road deaths doubling by next year’

    Minister of Interior Sar Kheng has expressed concern over the rate of traffic accidents, saying the death toll will double by 2020 if no effective preventive measures were put in place. At least five people on average are killed on Cambodian roads every day. The interior

  • Cambodian rice to lose EU duty-free status

    The Cambodian rice sector is set to lose its duty-free export status to the EU today – its major rice market – after the European bloc decided to impose tariffs on rice from Cambodia and Myanmar to curb a surge in such imports. The decision will be