Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Farmers hounded wherever they go

Farmers hounded wherever they go

Farmers hounded wherever they go

subde.jpg
subde.jpg

A mother and her baby among the 300 landless farmers outside the National Assembly

ABOUT 300 poor farmers from the northwest have had a hard time finding a place to

be.

First they were thrown off their land in Kbal Spean village outside Poipet. Then

Phnom Penh police kicked them out of the park in front of the National Assembly where

they were protesting. Now municipal authorities are threatening to remove them from

their new camp outside Wat Botum, where an Interior Ministry official initially gave

them permission to settle.

All this because wealthy people wanted their land. In the land grab 800 households

were bulldozed away. No compensation was paid. And the only replacement land offered

was in the middle of a field strewn with land-mines.

Other land-grab victims in Poipet advised the farmers to go to the National Assembly

and demonstrate. None of them knew that the municipality banned campsite protesters

from the spot in July, so they were distressed on August 25 when police showed up

just before midnight and threatened to use water cannons against them if they didn't

move away. The police also confiscated tarpaulins, sacks of rice and cans of dried

fish.

The following night around 11 pm police forcefully moved them to the city's official

protest location near the Naga Casino. But the area is wet and flooded these days,

so the farmers moved to the spot in front of Wat Botum, across the park from the

National Assembly.

Every morning they go to sit in front of the Assembly. At 5 pm they move back to

their makeshift camp outside the temple.

However, police now seem determined to confine them to the flooded area near the

casino. Every day police show up at the camp and tell the farmers to move.

But to where?, the villagers ask. A field with land mines outside Poipet?

MOST VIEWED

  • Hun Sen: Full country reopening to be decided in two weeks

    Prime Minister Hun Sen has announced that if the Covid-19 situation remains stable for 15 consecutive days from the end of the October 5-7 Pchum Ben public holiday, Cambodia will reopen fully, albeit in the context of Covid-19 whereby people have to adjust their lives to

  • Will Evergrande change the way Chinese developers do business in Cambodia?

    China’s property sector policy has exposed the grim financial condition of real estate developers including those operating in Cambodia, which raises questions over the viability of their projects and business going forward The dark blue netting draping over one of Yuetai Group Co Ltd’

  • Cambodia sets new Covid-19 quarantine rules

    The government has modified Covid-19 quarantine requirements, shortening the duration for, among others, Cambodian officials, foreign diplomats and delegations, investors and inbound travellers in general. According to an official notice signed by Minister of Health Mam Bun Heng late on October 16, quarantine length for Cambodian

  • Phnom Penh governor: Show Covid-19 vaccination cards, or else

    Phnom Penh municipal governor Khuong Sreng late on October 5 issued a directive requiring all people aged 18 and over and the parents of children aged 6-17 to produce Covid-19 vaccination cards when entering schools, markets, malls, marts, eateries and other business establishments that have been permitted

  • Cambodia seeks probe into 'false reports' on Hun Sen's alleged Cypriot passport

    Minister of Justice Koeut Rith on September 6 wrote a letter to his Cypriot counterpart Stephie Dracos requesting cooperation in investigating and providing the truth in relation to the "exaggerative and false allegations" that Prime Minister Hun Sen holds a Cypriot passport. In his letter, the

  • 'Pandora Papers' expose leaders' offshore millions

    More than a dozen heads of state and government, from Jordan to Azerbaijan, Kenya and the Czech Republic, have used offshore tax havens to hide assets worth hundreds of millions of dollars, according to a far-reaching new investigation by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (