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The ghost reporter

The ghost reporter

Some readers may remember the stories of a ghost that defied an eviction notice,

the wine made from toads that the Khmer Rouge once traded with China for tanks, and

the 'wooden mosquito net' article in the Phnom Penh Post during the early 90's.

They might have thought that the writer could never write a serious story. Not really.

In fact, starting with these articles the editors and senior colleagues taught me

how to write about the more important issues.

Gradually, my stories earned more interest from readers as well as some overseas

media, including the Nation in Bangkok and the Gemini News Service in London, which

bought a number of them. Then, the Cambodian Communication Institute employed me

in 1995 to train Cambodian journalists.

The most important thing the Post inspired in me was its free and independent stance

which is essential for my institute, where journalists from different political affiliations

come to learn professional practices.

I'm happy that the Post has managed to survive the past ten years. I'm proud to have

been its reporter and hope it will continue to be the model of our free press.

Nariddh was a reporter from 1992 to 1995. He now works at the Cambodian Communication

Institute.

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