Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Lifesavers just a phonecall away

Lifesavers just a phonecall away

Lifesavers just a phonecall away


Free, comprehensive emergency medical services are available 24 hours a day to

help deal with Phnom Penh's calamities. The Post's Beth Moorthy and Samreth

Sopha find out what happens when you dial 119. Photos by Heng Sinith.

An injured woman is tended to on her way to hospital. Photo by Heng Sinith

THE phone rings in a small room behind Calmette Hospital, and an emergency technician

springs for it. "Where? Where?" he demands.

He puts the phone down and heads for the ambulance, followed by the rest of his team,

who moments before were lounging around a TV. The instant response is all in a day's

work for the emergency medical team.

"It's never boring, we get lots of calls," says first aid technician So

Maneath, 30. The city's four free emergency medical teams go out an average of 500

times per month.

The team piles into the ambulance: the driver and first aid technician in front,

the doctor in the back. They hit the siren as they pull out onto Monivong Boulevard

- but the traffic flow doesn't lessen significantly.

"The problem is, people don't pull over," laments Em Chan, 32, a soldier

turned ambulance driver. "The people don't really know [to pull over] and don't

really want to know, they don't respect the law ... it's definitely frustrating."

The ambulance battles its way around a roundabout and heads up Route 5, losing a

bid for an intersection with a dump truck and dodging traffic which continues relatively

unabated - motos blithely overtaking cars, putting themselves directly in the ambulance's

path.

Still, the response time is quick, even in rush hour. There are two ambulance teams

based at northerly Calmette, and two at southerly Preah Norodom Sihanouk Hospital;

between them, the maximum response time to anywhere in Phnom Penh is 15 minutes,

according to Frederic Muller, a consultant with the French Red Cross.

"I like driving fast," smiles Chan, although he says he rarely goes over

60kph in the city.

The ambulance pulls up at the accident scene less than ten minutes after the call

was placed. Crowds of people are standing around, at first obscuring the victim,

a woman run over by a moto. The ambulance crew leaps out, grabs the stretcher and

carries it to the woman. She has serious-looking wounds on her face, and the doctor

quickly okays her to be lifted onto the stretcher.

Once she is safely in the ambulance, her daughter holding her hand, the doctor begins

to check her blood pressure and clean and bandage her wounds. But the ambulance can't

pull out for its return trip due to the traffic jam the crowds of onlookers and rubbernecking

drivers have created.

"There's always so many people in the street, it's a problem, they all want

to go in the ambulance," says Muller. "It's hard to tell people to stay

away, let us work."

With the help of police, the ambulance clears a path and gets underway, finishing

the round trip in less than 20 minutes. The woman is rushed into Calmette's emergency

room - and will never have to pay a single riel for the quick action that might have

saved her life.

Their job done, the medics pull off their rubber gloves and head back to the ready

room, to wait for the next call.

The city's only free emergency medical service began work in late September 1997,

according to Anne Schweighofer, chief of delegation of the French Red Cross.

One of SAMU's fleet of four ambulances. Photo by Heng Sinith.

That year's massive tragedies - the March grenade attack which killed almost 20 and

the September plane crash which killed 64 - spurred the program into action.

"At the beginning, we had no building, we all slept in hammocks - we started

with nothing, just one ambulance and enough money for the staff," recalls Muller.

"In March 97, there was nobody to take care of the people - now this will never

happen again because we are here."

The SAMU (the French acronym for emergency medical service) staff are all from the

Cambodian Red Cross, but the program is funded by the French Red Cross and the European

Community Humanitarian Office (ECHO). A second ambulance team was added in Jan 98,

and in Sept 98 ECHO funded two more.

Thanks to an intensive Khmer-language publicity campaign, the ambulances are receiving

over 250 phone calls per month. Both the emergency number, 119, and the regular land

line, (023) 724 891, connect immediately to the ready room.

"It's free to call 119 from any phone, mobile phones, public phones," says

Schweighofer. "But we do get kids calling sometimes from public phones, so it's

good we have the other line too."

Many of the call-outs, however, come over the ICOM radio from police who get to the

accident site first. "We work very closely with the police," Schweighofer

says, explaining that when the program started, the FRC did a training day with the

police. "It works very well."

From Sept 97 to Feb 99, the emergency medical teams have been called out 4335 times.

Despite the intransigence of Phnom Penh drivers, the ambulances have only had three

accidents - twice they were hit side-on by cars (whose drivers both paid for the

damage) and once a driver hit and killed a motorcyclist who was driving on the wrong

side of the road with no lights.

"It was terrible, we are very sorry about that," Schweighofer says. "But

there have only been three accidents, and none of them were our fault."

A total of 36 Cambodian medical staff - 12 teams of three, all male - are on rotation

duty, plus three receptionists who can answer the phone in Khmer, English and French.

Each team works a 24-hour shift and then has two days off.

Almost two-thirds of calls stem from traffic accidents, especially between 5pm and

midnight.

But the emergency workers agree that the hardest part of the job is when firearms

are involved.

"Sometimes it's hard when people make joke calls, but that's not so frequent,"

says logistics coordinator Muth Pisei.

"But what I really don't like is guns, sometimes there's military or police

there and I'm afraid."

The program currently operates in and around Phnom Penh. One man was brought to Calmette

from 40km outside the city. Neang Pheas, the victim's wife, said local police called

the ambulance and it arrived within 40 minutes of her husband's motorbike accident.

While lamenting she is too poor to afford hospital treatment, she said she was happy

the ambulance was free.

Another injured woman is hurried out of the ambulance. Photo by Heng Sinith

Muller says that the service has helped change people's attitudes towards accident

victims: "They used to shake people . . . or pile them onto cyclos to get them

to the hospital. Now they wait for us."

Schweighofer says they would like to expand the program, adding two ambulances each

in Siem Reap and Kampong Cham, but at the moment lack the funds. The two-year program

funding will expire in Sept 99 and she is concerned about where money will come from

to keep the service going.

The running cost for one ambulance is about $15,000 per year, which Schweighofer

says works out to a mere $6 per intervention.

"We are the only ambulance, the only ones who can help [for free]," says

first aid technician Maneath. "I feel happy to be able to help."

MOST VIEWED

  • Proof giants walked among us humans?

    For years a debate has waged about whether certain bas relief carvings at the 12th-century To Prohm Temple, one of the most popular attractions at the Angkor Wat Temple Complex in Siem Reap province, depicted dinosaurs or some rather less exotic and more contemporary animal,

  • Japan bank buys major stake in ANZ Royal Bank

    Japan's largest bank acquired more than half of ANZ’s shares in Cambodia on Thursday, according to a statement from Kith Meng’s Royal Group. Japan's JTrust Bank, announced that they had acquired a 55% of stake in ANZ Royal Bank. According to a Royal Group

  • Long way to go before Cambodia gets a ‘smart city’

    Phnom Penh, Siem Reap and Battambang will struggle to attain smart city status without adopting far reaching master plans, according to officials tasked with implementing the program. The brainchild of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean), the smart city program seeks to link up

  • China-Cambodia tourism forum held

    The Cambodian tourism sector must be prepared to welcome a growing number of Chinese tourists, as they lead the globe in the number of outbound travellers and were responsible for the most visitors to the Kingdom last year, the country’s tourism minister said on