Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - New rules suggested for public employees

New rules suggested for public employees

Prime Minister Hun Sen (centre) presides over a meeting at the Council of Ministers on Friday where a sub-decree regarding civil servants’ attendance was adopted by the government. Facebook
Prime Minister Hun Sen (centre) presides over a meeting at the Council of Ministers on Friday where a sub-decree regarding civil servants’ attendance was adopted by the government. Facebook

New rules suggested for public employees

A new government sub-decree addressing the regulation of working hours and attendance for civil servants and government contract employees was submitted to the Council of Ministers on Friday in an effort to increase productivity, but is still short on oversight and accountability, one observer said yesterday.

So-called “ghost workers” – employees who are paid for jobs they never turn up for, or who simply don’t exist – have plagued government payrolls for decades.

According to a summary of the decree that was made public, it allows for each ministry to set work schedule requirements, such as working hours and rules for working remotely or from home.

The sub-decree still requires the prime minister’s signature in order to become law.

While the summary makes no mention of how civil servants will be kept accountable, Public Function Minister Pech Bunthin, whose ministry wrote the sub-decree, yesterday said the full text includes provisions to punish those who fail to abide by regulations.

“By having that sub-decree, we ask that every civil servant be accountable; because for those who don’t come to work, they will receive a punishment like being fired; and for those who work hard, they will be promoted,” he said.

Chan Youttha, a spokesman for the Ministry of Water Resources and Meteorology, welcomed the new rules, saying it “empowers the institution to handle the work and allows them to be flexible”.

Ou Virak, head of the think tank Future Forum, said there are positives in allowing institutions the liberty to set work schedules based on the realities of different jobs.

However, Virak recommended that an oversight mechanism be put in place to ensure accountability.

“There should be an independent evaluation . . . to make clear the work roles and responsibilities” of each ministry, he said, explaining that ministries can have overlapping responsibilities, making the evaluation of staff difficult.

Public Function Minister Bunthin, however, maintained that “we don’t need any independent audit or evaluation, because every ministry or institution has audits to evaluate the performance of the civil servants and the quality of their work”.

MOST VIEWED

  • US names new ambassador to Cambodia

    US President Donald Trump on Friday appointed W Patrick Murphy as the new US Ambassador to Cambodia, replacing incumbent William A Heidt. A press release posted on the White House’s website said nominee W Patrick Murphy is currently acting principal deputy assistant secretary at

  • Kingdom is at a crossroads between East, West after poll

    It was dubbed a success by caretaker prime minister Hun Sen after the electoral victory of his Cambodian People’s Party (CPP), which is poised to take all seats in the National Assembly. But the July 29 national election has not been positively looked at by

  • Chinese influence to sweep Kingdom?

    Growing Cambodia-China ties have seen the latter’s influence sweep across the Kingdom through increased investments and tourism. The Asian giant has become the leading source of foreign funds in Cambodia, fuelling the construction sector with huge casino and hotel projects. Much of the growth

  • Final poll results confirm first single-party Assembly

    IN an unprecedented situation in Cambodian politics, the official results of the July 29 national elections have declared that the Cambodian People’s Party (CPP) will take all 125 seats in the National Assembly on the back of it receiving 76 per cent of the votes. The National