Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Over-the-hill expats stumble into print

Over-the-hill expats stumble into print

Over-the-hill expats stumble into print

T HE Post has decided to carry a article on the Hash House Harriers after they expressed disappointment at not being given a couple of column inches for their 100th anniversary 'run'.

The Harriers meet every Sunday in front of the Phnom Penh Railway Station at 4 pm. Responsible and mature individuals are not encouraged to attend.

Between 30 and 70 expats band together like a pack of hounds in pursuit of communal dipsomania. They thirst for a culturally insensitive good time at the cost of $5 to buy the grog.

Not content with imbibing alcohol and 'running' over 100 times in two years, at distances of three to nine km at curb-crawling speed, these insecure expats are even quite happy to boast about their feats.

Their deeds are recorded on an A4-sized sheet codenamed P2H3.

The Phnom Penh Hash House Herald is typical of rags which cater to flatter the odd egocentric tastes of the numerous neurotic expats found in the country.

The protagonists boast of their prowess in a thinly-disguised attempt at pastiche.

Masquerading under improbably lewd nicknames, too depraved to mention in a family newspaper, they relate their drinking, running and other bodily functions with an indecent glee that causes one to despair of the human race (no pun intended).

However, there are some redeeming features. Articles dealing with local politics, rural issues, gardening tips, livestock health problems, not forgetting readers' letters, travel advice, spiritual solace (of the ethereal kind), crimewatch and other items are readable.

If one is ready to undergo masochistic rituals involving running shoes, financial contributions, and pouring beer over other club members in full and unabashed view of the general public, then one is ready to join the Harriers and make a hash of one's life.

NGO to assist

THERE is no money to send the volleyball and basketball teams to compete in the Asian games, according to Cambodian Volleyball federation Bou Chum Serey.

He added that he is unsure of when the teams will begin competing again at international level.

But he added that he was hopeful of gaining international recognition for the sports with the help provided by Cooperative Services International (CSI).

The Cambodian representative of the American funded NGO, Bruce Carlton, said CSI would provide three American professionals to train 50 Khmer coaches over a two-year period, and further provide instruction in refereeing, sports medicine and administration.

- Fabien Dulphy writes

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