Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Pedophiles take refuge in provinces

Pedophiles take refuge in provinces

Pedophiles take refuge in provinces

Sopheap has been groomed for sex since he was eight years old. For the last five

years, his parents have received money, land, a new home, and numerous family holidays

from a sinister benefactor who asked only one thing in return: to sexually abuse

their son.

Belgian national Philippe Dessart, 47, initially began supporting Sopheap - now 13

- through a local NGO before cultivating a private relationship with the child's

family. Dessart's arrest on April 8 in Phnom Penh by the government's Anti-Trafficking

and Juvenile Protection Unit - acting on a tip from Action Pour les Enfants (APLE)

- finally released Sopheap from his nightmare of sexual abuse.

But, as law enforcement improves in the capital, foreign pedophiles are relocating

to the provinces where police are less proactive about pedophilia, said Katherine

Keane, Sihanoukville project officer for Action Pour les Enfants.

"Over the last 12 to 18 months we have seen less child sex abuse in Phnom Penh

and more in the provinces," said Keane. "In rural areas there is no monitoring

at all."

Huge progress has been made in Phnom Penh in both prosecuting and preventing foreign

pedophilia, according to Keo Thea, deputy chief of the Phnom Penh municipality's

Anti-Human Trafficking and Juvenile Protection office.

"The police at my office are very closely observing the pedophile issue and

now as a result foreigners are afraid to commit child sex crimes [in Phnom Penh],"

he said.

According to Keane, the situation outside Phnom Penh is a different story. The April

10 arrest of German national Alexander Watrin, 36, in Sihanoukville, illustrates

the discrepancy, she said.

"The way both cases have been handled so far has been different. Things take

far longer [in Sihanoukville]; in Phnom Penh they are able to act quickly."

Foreign pedophilia represents only a small percentage of overall child sex offenses

in Cambodia. According to Ministry of Interior 2005 statistics there were 665 reported

cases of child sex offences, resulting in 280 investigations with 397 offenders arrested.

Only a little more than 1 percent of these child sex offenders were foreign nationals,

compared with 3 percent in 2004.

Prosecuting a foreign national in Cambodia is more of a problem for authorities than

prosecuting a Cambodian, says Naly Pilorge, director of human rights NGO LICADHO.

"Police are hesitant and cautious about the prosecution of foreigners since

they are high profile," she said.

Keane claims that police in Sihanoukville are more hesitant about making arrests

when the accused is a foreign national.

"It is very hard dealing with foreigners," she said. "[The police]

are nervous of the consequences of arresting and prosecuting - there can be a huge

political fallout if they get it wrong."

In Phnom Penh police have overcome such barriers and are now adept at identifying

and gathering evidence against foreign pedophiles, said Keo Thea.

"We follow [suspected pedophiles] secretly by pretending to be a motodop - so

the foreigners will not know they are watched by police," he said. "Then,

if they commit sex crimes with children, the police are already monitoring the situation

and will catch them."

The police force is also working with tourism officials to ensure child abusers are

not tolerated.

"We have built good cooperation with guesthouse and hotel owners. They no longer

allow foreigners to stay in the guest house or hotel with young people," said

Keo Thea.

In addition to leaving Phnom Penh, foreign pedophiles have evolved alternative methods

of accessing children in response to police improvements.

"It is more of a trend now to see long-term residents move to Sihanoukville,

provide financial support to the child and family, even provide schooling,"

said Keane.

"Travelling sex offenders are using provincial orphanages and shelters as part

of their 'grooming techniques' to gain access to children, for example, by offering

to sponsor a child - there are often no background checks in place."

The abject poverty pervasive across much of rural Cambodia is exploited by comparatively

wealthy foreign nationals seeking to sexually abuse children and evade prosecution,

Keane said. Elaborate networks of support - such as that built between Dessart and

Sopheap's family - are carefully constructed.

"Some [foreign pedophiles] target street children, but we have some victims

who do have families; in some situations the families will be actively encouraging

the child to develop and continue the sexually abusive relationship," said Keane.

"These children and families know where the money is coming from and are often

reluctant to provide evidence of abuse if it will jeopardize that financial relationship."

In addition to co-opting the victim's family, a facade of "support" serves

to disguise the true nature of the relationship from under-resourced and inadequately

trained provincial police forces.

"The police don't have the capacity to identify long-term, settled-in abusers,"

said Keane. "In Sihanoukville they are not trained and lack the education and

resources."

MOST VIEWED

  • Analyst: Rainsy blocked from boarding flight 'an excuse'

    THAI Airways not allowing Sam Rainsy on its route from Paris to Bangkok on Thursday is being used as an excuse to keep his standing among fellow coup plotters and his uninformed supporters as flights to non-Asean countries are available, an analyst said on Friday.

  • Rainsy lands in Malaysia

    Cambodian opposition figure Sam Rainsy arrived in Kuala Lumpur airport on Saturday afternoon after boarding a flight from Paris, where he has been living for more than four years. Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation spokesperson Koy Kuong said on Saturday that Cambodia respected

  • Touch: Rainsy will never return

    Sam Rainsy, the “acting president” of the Supreme Court-dissolved Cambodia National Rescue Party (CNRP), has claimed it has achieved 70 per cent of its struggle to find a solution to the current political situation in the Kingdom. Just before boarding a plane at Charles de Gaulle

  • Sokha continues call for dropping of charge after bail conditions reduced

    Not satisfied with having his bail conditions reduced, allowing him to travel freely in Cambodia, Kem Sokha says he wants his charge totally dropped. “As an innocent man who has been in detention for two years even without being found guilty, I continue to demand

  • MEPs' call for Rainsy's safety not European Parliament position

    The European Parliament said on Friday that a statement by 56 Members of the European Parliament (MEPs) calling for guarantees of Sam Rainsy’s freedom and safety should he return to Cambodia did not represent its position. Delphine Colard, the European Parliament’s press officer told

  • Sar Kheng: Rainsy return not blocked

    Minister of Interior Sar Kheng clarified that Cambodia had never blocked Sam Rainsy from returning to the Kingdom. However, he said Cambodia reserved the right to take legal action as allowed by law against activities aimed at destroying the Kingdom. “No one blocked the return