Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Prime Minister's 'iron fist' campaign has judges, prosecutors in cross hairs

Prime Minister's 'iron fist' campaign has judges, prosecutors in cross hairs

Prime Minister's 'iron fist' campaign has judges, prosecutors in cross hairs

The Supreme Council of Magistracy (SCM) are continuing to review a list of court

officials who may face expulsion if they are judged guilty of wrongdoings, said Hanrot

Raken, a member of the SCM.

Phnom Penh municipal court judge Kong Sarith and deputy prosecutor Siem Sok Aun were

sacked this week, according to Ministry of Justice officials.

In addition, judges Ham Mengse and Hing Thirith, and deputy prosecutor Khut Sopheang

have been suspended for one year, while Phnom Penh municipal court chief prosecutor

Ouk Savouth was given a warning.

The decision to expel a judge and a prosecutor, and suspend two more judges and a

prosecutor, is the first time that the SCM has punished court staff since the council's

honorary head, King Norodom Sihamoni, came to power in October, Raken said.

"The SCM took about one month to make a decision about the punishment of these

judges and prosecutors," said Raken, "The SCM decision cannot be appealed."

Judge Kong Sarith told the Post on July 14 that he has heard rumors about his expulsion

but has not yet received any official word from the SCM.

"If [SCM] expelled me, it would be an injustice to me," said Sarith. "I

am shocked after hearing this information."

The other court officials involved were not available for comment.

Raken attended a July 11 meeting with the SCM - presided over by King Sihamoni -

in which they discussed punishing the judges and prosecutors as well as rotating

the placement of judges and prosecutors every four years so that they will avoid

creating networks of power that may foster corruption or bias.

"If we talk about procedure, the decision is correct because it was made by

the Supreme Council of Majesty that has the King and other members participating

in making decisions," said Ouk Vandeth, director of Legal Aid of Cambodia.

"If we depend on law, the decision was not correct because laws pertaining to

the ethics of judges have not been established yet," Vandeth said.

Raken said the real problem was a shortage of staff at the courts.

"In Cambodia there are 200 judges and prosecutors. This amount is not enough.

We need double the judges and prosecutors to handle the upcoming cases at the moment,"

Raken said.

"The changing of judges and prosecutors will affect the judges and prosecutors

that take their place because they will have to re-investigate cases and that it

a waste of time," he said.

MOST VIEWED

  • Negotiations on EBA being held

    In an effort to defuse tensions, a senior government official said Cambodia is negotiating with the European Union (EU) on the Everything But Arms (EBA) trade deal, which allows the Kingdom to export goods to the 28-member bloc tariff-free. The EU notified Cambodia on October 5

  • EU officials: Ending EBA an 18-month procedure

    EU officials have confirmed that it will take a total of 18 months to complete the procedure if Cambodia’s preferential Everything But Arms (EBA) trade agreement is to be withdrawn. According to EU Agriculture and Rural Development spokesman Daniel Rosario, the formal process has not

  • Chinese police escort deported scam suspects

    Ninety-one Chinese nationals accused of extorting money from victims in a Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) scam were deported from Phnom Penh International Airport on Monday under the escort of 182 Chinese police personnel. General Department of Immigration head of investigations Ouk Hay Seila told reporters

  • IPU slams government claim

    The president of the Inter-Parliamentary Union (IPU), Gabriela Cuevas Barron, has refuted a claim by the National Assembly that she “highly appreciated the achievements of Cambodia” in its July national elections with a tweet saying “Of course not!” before adding “No congratulations”. A delegation from