Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Pupils no longer taught about KR

Pupils no longer taught about KR

Pupils no longer taught about KR

C AMBODIAN children are currently being taught about World War Two and the Nazi

holocaust but not about their own country's more recent genocide.

Since

the election, Cambodia's schools have stopped teaching about the Khmer Rouge.

The little-known shift in policy was brought to protect young children

from the "cruelty and barbarism" of the regime and because the government has

not yet figured out how it wants to teach history, says a senior Education

Ministry official who asked not to be named.

"Now history is difficult

for us, because of the change of regime, we have to write history according to

the new regime," the official said, adding educators are waiting for a clear

message from government.

"It's extremely political, with both CPP and

Funcinpec," which have widely divergent opinions about how history should be

taught, explains George Taylor, a British educator advising the

ministry.

The result is that while teachers wait for the new lesson

plans, many of the more than two million school children in Cambodia - although

they generally know the name Pol Pot - have to turn elsewhere to learn about

what happened between 1975 an 1979.

"The Khmer Rouge? They live in the

jungle. They cut logs. They kill villagers, rob villagers. They plant mines,"

said 11-year-old Nok Sothea.

Where did he learn that? "Television."

Som Bora, also age 11, said he has learned all about Pol Pot from his

father.

"They killed all the people who had learned a lot, and then the

people who could not read and write were made the heads of the village," he said

quietly, frowning. Now, "they kill intellectuals and they rob peoples' property

to buy ammunition."

Adding to the confusion about the curriculum, King

Norodom Sihanouk has called on citizens to strive for "national reconciliation."

The old policy of the previous Vietnam-backed State of Cambodia

government, which used intensive lessons on the Khmer Rouge as a propaganda tool

to maintain national anger, simply does not fit in with the policy of

reconciliation, the education official said.

Between 1980 and 1993

children from the age of seven "had lessons of the Khmer Rouge time. They taught

them of the torture and the killing and they put photos on the walls," says Top

Siv Hun, head of the English department at Chak Angre school in Phnom

Penh.

"The lesson was to make them angry with the Khmer Rouge. But they

were not angry - they wanted to act like the Khmer Rouge," she said, describing

schoolyard war games in which some children would 'execute' their classmates.

Dropping Pol Pot from lessons, at least in the younger grades, has made

the schoolyards more peaceful, the education official said.

"We don't

want to show to the pupils what happened in the Pol Pot regime... we were afraid

about the psychological impact on the children," he said.

Peou Sorpong,

a research fellow at the Singapore-based Institute of Southeast Asian Studies,

says it is vital that Cambodia develop a clear and detailed history curriculum,

especially in senior grades and at the post-secondary level.

"The

government must teach the youth about the country's history, and how to

critically analyze it. It is an essential ingredient for peaceful relations

between the governors and the governed," said Sorpong, who is currently

researching Cambodia and its impact on regional security.

Education

Minister Tol Lah says it is the government's intention to put the Khmer Rouge

back in the history lessons.

"One thing you can be sure of is we are

going to be teaching history according to what happened," he said, adding that

some teaching about the Khmer Rouge may still be taking place "on the initiative

of individual teachers."

Says English teacher Top Siv Hun: "It should be

included, but not for younger children. Maybe it should start in lower high

school."

MOST VIEWED

  • Cambodia unveils new quarantine regulations

    The government has modified Covid-19 quarantine requirements, shortening the duration for, among others, Cambodian officials, foreign diplomats and delegations, investors and inbound travellers in general. According to an official notice signed by Minister of Health Mam Bun Heng late on October 16, quarantine length for Cambodian

  • Cambodia sets new Covid-19 quarantine rules

    The government has modified Covid-19 quarantine requirements, shortening the duration for, among others, Cambodian officials, foreign diplomats and delegations, investors and inbound travellers in general. According to an official notice signed by Minister of Health Mam Bun Heng late on October 16, quarantine length for Cambodian

  • Hun Sen: Cambodia set to fully reopen

    Prime Minister Hun Sen concludes that the October 5-7 Pchum Ben public holiday, during which many people either flocked to their hometowns for family reunion or gathered at tourist attractions across the country, has not caused an outbreak of Covid-19. In a special address to

  • Will Evergrande change the way Chinese developers do business in Cambodia?

    China’s property sector policy has exposed the grim financial condition of real estate developers including those operating in Cambodia, which raises questions over the viability of their projects and business going forward The dark blue netting draping over one of Yuetai Group Co Ltd’

  • Cambodia resumes issuance of tourist visas

    The Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation has announced the resumption of its tourist visa and visa exemption programme after a long hiatus due to the Covid-19 pandemic. In a letter dated October 20 and addressed to foreign embassies and consulates, foreign minister Prak Sokhonn

  • Cambodia voted ‘world’s friendliest country’ in Rough Guides reader poll

    Cambodia ranked number one among the “World’s Friendliest Countries”, according to a reader poll conducted by London-based international website “Rough Guides”. Taking submissions through Twitter and Facebook, “Rough Guides”, a well-known travel agency and publisher of guidebooks, said the Kingdom “was by far the