Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Rainsy sharpens knives for Tokyo meeting

Rainsy sharpens knives for Tokyo meeting

Rainsy sharpens knives for Tokyo meeting

Opposition lawmaker Sam Rainsy is keen to meet the donor community in Tokyo June 11-13 to hammer home what he says are key discrepancies in the RGC's donor-related promises and actions.

Reeling off a litany of alleged failures of the government to abide by donor expectations in the realms of financial management, formation of a KR tribunal and illegal logging, Rainsy says his task will be to remind donors of the shortfalls of the Hun Sen government.

"While the KR tribunal has been stalled yet again, logging has been continuing unabated... a view that's being shared by the pro-government newspapers and the latest Global Witness report," Rainsy said. "Why should donors keep pumping in millions of dollars in infrastructure projects like roads and bridges that will get washed away every rainsy season due to floods which, in turn, are directly linked to indiscriminate logging?"

According to Rainsy, the RGC's macro-economic report claiming five per cent GDP growth rate was "grossly misleading" due its relation to a corresponding growth in the population.

"The figure also reflects export earnings from natural products like unprocessed latex, timber and agricultural produce that's neither sustainable and nor a significant contributor to employment generation or technology buildup," he said. "Instead, the timber trade and a thriving sex industry are bound to claim severe long term environmental, economic, social, and cultural costs that will offset much of the development achieved so far... the donors will have to pay attention to that."

Referring to the government's demand for an additional US$15 million to proceed with the demobilization process as a reflection of its "beggar mentality", Rainsy said the number of soldiers needing demobilization could be considerably reduced simply by striking off the names of ghost soldiers and 'occasional' soldiers.

But Rainsy also conceded his own role in some of the Kingdom's economic woes, in particular the 1994-Investment Law he drafted during his brief tenure as Cambodia's Finance Minister which focused heavily on incentives for foreign investment.

"The trouble is, we treat all sorts of investments the same way," he said of the failure of that investment law. "Those who come here to exploit the country's natural resources and add no value to their exports, create few jobs and don't bring in any technology are undeserving candidates."

MOST VIEWED

  • Angkor Wat named as the top landmark for the second year

    Travel website TripAdvisor has named Cambodia’s ancient wonder Angkor Wat as the top landmark in the world for the second year running in their Travelers’ Choice Award 2018, an achievement Cambodian tourism operators expect will attract more tourists to the Kingdom. The website uses traveller

  • New US bill ‘is a violation of Cambodian independence’

    After a US congressmen introduced bipartisan legislation that will enact sanctions on Cambodian officials responsible for “undermining democracy” in the Kingdom, government officials and the ruling Cambodian People’s Party on Sunday said they regarded the potential action as the “violation of independence and sovereignty

  • Hun Sen detractors ‘will die’

    Prime Minister Hun Sen on Wednesday said those who curse or insult him would eventually die without a plot of land to bury their bodies after being killed by lightning, suffering the same fate as those who recently died in Thmar Baing district in Koh

  • Ministry’s plan for net sparks fears

    The government has ordered all domestic and international internet traffic in the Kingdom to pass through a Data Management Centre (DMC) that has been newly created by the state-owned Telecom Cambodia, in a move some have claimed is an attempt to censor government critics. Spokesman