Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Roving reporter

Roving reporter

Roving reporter

Do you think the election was free and fair?

Chea Kola: Before we were too scared to express our opinion freely but now

we can. It is a historic chance for Cambodia to have democracy.

Kong Soron: Nobody threatened me. I'm very happy UNTAC arranged the election

and I think it was fair enough for our people even though it was not perfect.

Ken Ney: This was a great opportunity for the Cambodian people to express

their ideas for a new government through a free and fair election.

Keo Leangki: Before we were too scared to express our opinion freely. But

now we had the chance. This is an historic occasion for Cambodia to have democracy.

Raoul M, Jeannar, International Observer

Despite a very high level of intimidation, there was a real campaign and the people

were able to know which party they could vote for. Thanks to the secrecy of the ballot,

they were able to make a free and fair choice. Congratulations to the U.N volunteers

and the Cambodian polling officials.

Julio Jelders, Khmer Institute of Democracy

The elections were a great demonstration of the Khmer people's desire for peace and

national reconciliation. The electoral campaign was neither free nor fair because

of the violence, intimidation and harassment of opposition parties. UNTAC and Khmer

polling officials did an outstanding job in organizing the elections.

Sue Downie, UIP correspondent

With a turnout of 90 percent the voting has to be regarded as free but the campaign

period can not be regarded as fair as it did not meet Akashi's Apr. 21 criteria that

the election not be marred by violence, harassment, and intimidation and that the

State of Cambodia not have an unfair advantage through their use of the powers of

incumbency.

Le Sophan: I came from Kampuchea Krom (in southern Vietnam). I joined the

election and the peace walk in Phnom Penh. It is very good that the Cambodian people

had the election but I should not vote because I want to remain neutral.

Khiev Vana: I think this is the first free and fair election in Cambodia.

Kou Tom: People had a good chance to vote for the party they thought was best.

Chea Saly: There were no violence threats and we were free to choose the party

we wanted.

Seng Vouth: I was not pressured to vote for any party. As for me I can say

the election was free and fair and held in a democratic way.

David Hark, International Observer

Akashi Laid out to the SNC four criteria for a free and fair election: non-intimidation

and non-violence; non-use of the state apparatus; access to the media; and, a technically

proper polling operation.

Regrettably, only one-and-a-half out of four of these conditions pertained. Ruling

party directed political violence, intimidation and harassment emanating from the

state security organs down to the village level was long standing and substantially

uncurbed. Ruling party use of the state apparatus was ubiquitous. Political opposition

access to media? The last week or so, maybe.

Redemptively, the UNTAC polling operation was unimaginably successful technically

and politically. Cambodians incontrovertibly confirmed their aspiration for democratic

elections in spectacular, historic and breathtaking collective act of national self-determination.

A truly wonderful election-but, not, by UNTAC's criteria, "free and fair,"

even though, of course, they have to say it was.

MOST VIEWED

  • US names new ambassador to Cambodia

    US President Donald Trump on Friday appointed W Patrick Murphy as the new US Ambassador to Cambodia, replacing incumbent William A Heidt. A press release posted on the White House’s website said nominee W Patrick Murphy is currently acting principal deputy assistant secretary at

  • Kingdom is at a crossroads between East, West after poll

    It was dubbed a success by caretaker prime minister Hun Sen after the electoral victory of his Cambodian People’s Party (CPP), which is poised to take all seats in the National Assembly. But the July 29 national election has not been positively looked at by

  • Chinese influence to sweep Kingdom?

    Growing Cambodia-China ties have seen the latter’s influence sweep across the Kingdom through increased investments and tourism. The Asian giant has become the leading source of foreign funds in Cambodia, fuelling the construction sector with huge casino and hotel projects. Much of the growth

  • Western poll flak is ‘pressure to take the Kingdom hostage’

    After last month’s national elections brought praise for the orderly manner they were run and managed, the ruling Cambodian People’s Party (CPP) spokesman Sok Eysan dismissed criticism from the West as a “violation of the Kingdom’s independence”. He said the attitude of