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Sin Rozeth’s drainage system gets OK from Battambang governor

Battambang’s O’Char Commune Chief Sin Rozeth (front) inspects an area in her commune where she is developing a drainage system, in an image posted to her Facebook page last week. Facebook
Battambang’s O’Char Commune Chief Sin Rozeth (front) inspects an area in her commune where she is developing a drainage system, in an image posted to her Facebook page last week. Facebook

Sin Rozeth’s drainage system gets OK from Battambang governor

Battambang Town Governor Sieng Emvunsy yesterday conceded that opposition Commune Chief Sin Rozeth can continue construction on a drainage system in the locale following an outpouring of support from villagers.

The popular Cambodia National Rescue Party chief of O’Char commune was again in the crosshairs of local officials and ruling party lawmaker Chheang Vun for building a drainage system to alleviate the commune’s flooding issues.

Despite Rozeth having the support of the villagers, authorities claimed the project did not meet the town’s technical specifications.

Emvunsy said he approved the system because villagers did not want to see it removed, but noted a technical team’s inspection had found that the drain’s trench was not low enough and its pipes were sticking out.

“But if citizens said it was OK, then go ahead,” he said. “But if they want to get technical [assistance] and make a request to us, we will study the area and help accordingly.”

He did say that it would be advisable for Rozeth to get the right guidance before proceeding with any future projects.

Yesterday, Rozeth said that she was yet to hear directly from the governor but that villagers had conveyed his remarks to her.

Rozeth was pulled up earlier this month for accidentally not charging villagers for services, with the commune chief saying she would pay the commune council for the mistake.

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